Thursday 27 November 2014

Adams appeals for help in finding IRA 'disappeared'

Michael Brennan Deputy Political Editor

Published 22/06/2013 | 05:00

Gerry Adams
Gerry Adams

SINN Fein leader Gerry Adams is calling for information in finding the bodies of victims secretly killed and buried in unknown locations by the IRA, despite still being implicated in such murders himself.

Mr Adams continues to be hounded by accusations from former IRA members that he ordered the kidnap and murder of Belfast mother-of-10 Jean McConville in 1972.

The Catholic woman was among dozens of people – later known as the 'disappeared' – who were abducted, murdered and secretly buried by the IRA during the Troubles.

The Sinn Fein leader is continually named as a leader of the Provos throughout that period.

IRA Old Bailey bomber Dolours Price, who died in January, and another former IRA member, the late Brendan Hughes, both claimed Mr Adams ordered the killing and burial of Ms McConville – one of the most notorious murders of the Troubles.

Mr Adams has repeatedly denied ever having been in the IRA or any knowledge of Ms McConville's killing.

Labour Party TD Sean Kenny said nobody believed Mr Adams's many denials of being a senior IRA commander in the past.

"If he is appealing to people who are not coming forward and being helpful, then that is to be welcomed," he said.

Mr Adams is now calling for "anyone with information" on the whereabouts of those secretly killed and buried by the IRA to come forward.

His comments come as Hollywood star Liam Neeson and fellow actor James Nesbitt also issued an appeal for information on the seven of the 'disappeared' whose bodies have still not been found.

In total, 17 people were murdered and buried in secret, mainly by the Provisional IRA, during the Troubles.

Ten bodies have been recovered but a further seven have never been found.

Those missing include west Belfast IRA men Joe Lynskey and Brendan McGraw, as well as Captain Robert Nairac of the SAS. All three were killed by the IRA.

Mr Adams said he wanted to appeal again for anyone with any information on those killed and secretly buried by the IRA to contact the families, the Commission for the Location of Victims' Remains or himself.

The Commission for the Location of Victims' Remains was set up after the 1998 Good Friday Agreement to get confidential information that might lead to the location of those whose bodies have never been found.

Irish Independent

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