Saturday 1 November 2014

‘A light has gone out in all of our lives’

Cormac Murphy

Published 16/04/2014 | 13:27

Robin Webster and his daugter Chloe is comforted by family before the funeral of his wife Webster Yao at St Patricks Church Donabate. Picture credit; Damien Eagers 16/4/2014
Robin Webster is comforted by family before the funeral of his wife Webster Yao at St Patricks Church Donabate. Photo: Damien Eagers
Yao Webster
Yao Webster
The scene of the tragic accident where Yao Webster was killed in Dublin city centre
The scene of the tragic accident where Yao Webster was killed in Dublin city centre

MOURNERS at the funeral of a mother who was killed in an accident involving a Luas tram and a car heard today “a light has gone out”.

Yao Webster (35), originally from China, was struck by the car in the accident beside the Red Line in Dublin city centre on April 7 last.

Her husband Robin followed his wife's remains into St Patrick's Church in Donabate today, carrying their two-year-old daughter Chloe.

Yao's parents Fu Xudong and Lin Azhen were among the mourners, having travelled from China to say goodbye to their daughter.

Dozens of members of the capital's Chinese community attended the service in North Co Dublin.

Parish priest Fr Joe Connolly said: “We know today is a very dark day. It's an unbelievable day because a light has gone out with the death of those who we love.”

He asked the curate Fr Pat Reilly to place a white robe on the coffin, representing “our love for her and the love of God, which we wrap her in today”.

He added: “The little posey that's going to be placed on the coffin is from Chloe. Flowers are the symbol of life and death.”

A photo of Yao was also placed on the coffin as a reminder that “our love never dies and she will reign in our hearts forever”.

In his homily, Fr Connolly added: “Tragic death which is almost always sudden is like a blackout. One minute the sun is shining, the next it's as dark as night. Without the slightest warning or the slightest chance to prepare ourselves, we are plunged into impenetrable darkness.

“In the space of a minute, our whole world is tuned upside down.”

The priest praised the Chinese community in Dublin for their “love and support” for Robin and Chloe since the tragedy.

“We've all been touched by this tragic accident. (Yao) was a person full of life, full of love. When I met her for the first time, when she presented Chloe for baptism in this church, you could see on that occasion she was filled with love and joy,” he said.

Yao had been on her way to work in Usher's Quay post office when the accident occurred.

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