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Tuesday 16 September 2014

6-year-old shooting victim Sean Scully's 'life changed forever' as he remains confined to wheelchair

Anita McSorley

Published 01/07/2014 | 14:57

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Members of the Garda forensic team at the crime scene in Croftwood Gardens, Dublin, where a six-year-old boy was shot. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire
Members of the Garda forensic team at the crime scene in Croftwood Gardens, Dublin, where a six-year-old boy was shot. Photo: Brian Lawless/PA Wire

THE mother of the six-year-old boy who was shot while outside playing with friends in West Dublin two weeks ago has said his life has “changed forever now.”

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Little Sean Scully suffered catastrophic damage to his spinal cord after being shot in the neck in Ballyfermot on June 13.

“He’s hoisted to a wheelchair. From his chest down he has no feeling at all.

“His life’s changed forever now and even though they said they’re hopeful for a few steps, it could be five or six years down the line before he might.

“We are hopeful that he can get some balance in his arms to hold his top body up that he can go into the smaller one that he can push himself,” his mother Gillian told Joe Duffy on LiveLine this afternoon.

Had the bullet gone through her son’s spine, he would have been totally paralysed.

“If the bullet had of gone straight through the spinal cord he would have never walked again, but it didn’t and it’s just severely bruised,” she explained.

Gillian said she found it hard to explain to Sean what happened.

“He asked me before the operation what happened. He wasn’t wakened that much after the operation but when they were bringing him around he did ask me what happened.

“I said 'you know those pellet guns that the kids get on holidays?' and Sean knows how dangerous they were. I just wanted to say that it wasn’t his fault and nobody intentionally came for him. It was an accident. I told him it wasn’t his fault.

“He’s an extremely long road ahead of him and the injuries are horrific.

“His breathing, like the muscles in it, are very very weak. I don’t think he’ll ever get his cough back. He’s had to learn the machines and what to do every day just to clear his throat,” she said.

Looking on the brightside, she’s glad her son was not damaged mentally.

“He has his little personality. Nothing up there was damaged. It’s good in a sense, and in another sense he knows exactly what’s happening. It’s good that his little personality is there and you get the laughs out of him,” she said.

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