Thursday 17 August 2017

How to join in with the children of the revolution

Competitions offer a chance to mark the Rising centenary in art, poetry and song

Transition year students at Scoil Mhuire in Trim pictured with their teachers Maira Ni Anluain (on left) and Eimear Flynn and their project on the 100 years commemoration of 1916. Note the used tea bags on the table, which are used to add a retro sepia col
Transition year students at Scoil Mhuire in Trim pictured with their teachers Maira Ni Anluain (on left) and Eimear Flynn and their project on the 100 years commemoration of 1916. Note the used tea bags on the table, which are used to add a retro sepia col

With so much going on over the next few months around the centenary of the Rising, there is no shortage of fascinating projects and initiatives to get involved in as part of Ireland 2016's Youth and Imagination Programme.

As we have seen already in these pages, there are also a host of really interesting competitions that are open for entries from across the entire island of Ireland. Listed below are details for the all-island art and song competitions which are already drawing huge interest from across Ireland.

And in the inspiring year of Yeats 2015, when the country marked the 150th anniversary of the great poet's birth, there are two special poetry competitions to whet the appetite. Reproduced here is the ultimate poem about the Rising, Yeats's 'Easter, 1916', to give everyone a little inspiration as they prepare their entries. Best of luck!

All-Island Art competition

This partnership involving the Department of Education in Northern Ireland and the National Gallery of Ireland will invite early years settings and primary and post primary schools across the island to create an image based on imagining the Ireland of 2116. 38 winners will be displayed in the National Gallery of Ireland in September 2016. Full details of this will be available shortly on the education centre network, ateci.ie, and on Scoilnet.

All-Island song competition

Transition year students at Scoil Mhuire in Trim pictured with their teachers Maira Ni Anluain (on left) and Eimear Flynn and their project on the 100 years commemoration of 1916. Note the used tea bags on the table, which are used to add a retro sepia col
Transition year students at Scoil Mhuire in Trim pictured with their teachers Maira Ni Anluain (on left) and Eimear Flynn and their project on the 100 years commemoration of 1916. Note the used tea bags on the table, which are used to add a retro sepia col

Through a partnership between the Department of Education and Skills and the National Concert Hall, primary and post-primary students will be invited to write a song inspired by the modern, multi-cultural Ireland of 2016. The finalists will be invited to perform on stage of the National Concert Hall in May 2016. Two overall winners will be selected, one at primary and one at post-primary level. Full details can be found on the National Concert Hall website at nch.ie/online/education

All-Island Poetry competition

The Libraries and Postprimary Schools 1916 Poetry Competition invites postprimary students to submit a poem on the wide-ranging theme, "Your Ireland". For details, see librariesireland.ie/services-to-schools, from January 2016. The Poetry Aloud All-Island Poetry-Speaking competition for postprimary schools, organised jointly by the National Library of Ireland and Poetry Ireland, will encourage poems on 1916 themes. Full details are available at  http://www.nli.ie/

Easter, 1916 By WB Yeats

I have met them at close of day

Coming with vivid faces

From counter or desk among grey

The Dublin Bread Company on Sackville Street after the Rising. Photo: Irish Independent/NPA
The Dublin Bread Company on Sackville Street after the Rising. Photo: Irish Independent/NPA

Eighteenth-century houses.

I have passed with a nod of the head

Or polite meaningless words,

Or have lingered awhile and said

Polite meaningless words,

And thought before I had done

Of a mocking tale or a gibe

To please a companion

Around the fire at the club,

Being certain that they and I

But lived where motley is worn:

All changed, changed utterly:

A terrible beauty is born.

 

That woman's days were spent

In ignorant good-will,

Her nights in argument

Until her voice grew shrill.

What voice more sweet than hers

When, young and beautiful,

She rode to harriers?

This man had kept a school

And rode our wingèd horse;

This other his helper and friend

Was coming into his force;

He might have won fame in the end,

So sensitive his nature seemed,

So daring and sweet his thought.

This other man I had dreamed

A drunken, vainglorious lout.

He had done most bitter wrong

To some who are near my heart,

Yet I number him in the song;

He, too, has resigned his part

In the casual comedy;

He, too, has been changed in his turn,

Transformed utterly:

A terrible beauty is born.

Hearts with one purpose alone

Through summer and winter seem

Enchanted to a stone

To trouble the living stream.

The horse that comes from the road,

The rider, the birds that range

From cloud to tumbling cloud,

Minute by minute they change;

A shadow of cloud on the stream

Changes minute by minute;

A horse-hoof slides on the brim,

And a horse plashes within it;

The long-legged moor-hens dive,

And hens to moor-cocks call;

Minute by minute they live;

The stone's in the midst of all.

 

Too long a sacrifice

Can make a stone of the heart.

O when may it suffice?

That is Heaven's part, our part

To murmur name upon name,

As a mother names her child

When sleep at last has come

On limbs that had run wild.

What is it but nightfall?

No, no, not night but death;

Was it needless death after all?

For England may keep faith

For all that is done and said.

We know their dream; enough

To know they dreamed and are dead;

And what if excess of love

Bewildered them till they died?

I write it out in a verse -

MacDonagh and MacBride

And Connolly and Pearse

Now and in time to be,

Wherever green is worn,

Are changed, changed utterly:

A terrible beauty is born.

Irish Independent

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