Friday 28 April 2017

Cabinet shoots down plan for capital's '1916 Quarter'

Poet Catherine Ann Cullen, artist Robert Ballagh, poet Louis de Paor and Prof Michael Cronin with medallion designed by Robert Ballagh at the launch of a competition to find new writing on the topic: ‘The Vision of 1916: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’. Photo: Leah Farrell
Poet Catherine Ann Cullen, artist Robert Ballagh, poet Louis de Paor and Prof Michael Cronin with medallion designed by Robert Ballagh at the launch of a competition to find new writing on the topic: ‘The Vision of 1916: Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow’. Photo: Leah Farrell
Kevin Doyle

Kevin Doyle

Proposals to turn the area around Moore Street and the GPO into a '1916 Quarter' are to be rejected by the Government.

Fianna Fáil has compiled a plan that would ban construction of buildings that are not seen to be fit with the history of the area.

Eamon O Cuiv said it went much further than the Government's current plans to refurbish the final headquarters of the 1916 leaders at numbers 14 to 17 Moore Street and turn them into a tourist attraction.

Mr O Cuiv's bill, which will be voted on by TDs tonight, would protect other key Easter Rising locations including the GPO, Bolands Mills, South Dublin Union (St James's Hospital), the old Jacobs factory and the Royal College of Surgeons.

"Future generations will be very critical of us if we don't preserve the streetscape of Moore Street, as that is where the final battle of 1916 was fought," he said.

"If this [bill] was taken on board the GPO in Dublin and the surrounding area would be a must-visit place for all people coming to Dublin interested in the history of the city," he said.

His plan provides for an urban development company to oversee the creation of the 1916 historical quarter.

"Beginning with the GPO and Moore Street area, the development company would undertake major regeneration and restoration works in and around Dublin city centre, which would not only serve to mark an important event in Ireland's history, but would also breathe life back into areas which have fallen into disrepair," Mr O Cuiv said.

The proposal being put forward was discussed at Cabinet yesterday, where the Government made a decision to oppose the plan.

Irish Independent

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