Friday 24 February 2017

Britain refuses to hand over the 'Black Diaries'

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Dr Anne Casement, Patrick Casement and Cllr Cormac Devlin at Doyles Cottage as Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council
announces a Roger Casement statue commission. Photo: Maura Hickey
Dr Anne Casement, Patrick Casement and Cllr Cormac Devlin at Doyles Cottage as Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council announces a Roger Casement statue commission. Photo: Maura Hickey

The British government has refused to hand over the Roger Casement diaries to Ireland after Dublin City Council petitioned ex-prime minister David Cameron for them.

Five journals, known as the 'Black Diaries', which alleged he was a homosexual man, are kept in the UK Public Records Office in Surrey.

Irish patriot Roger Casement. Photo by Central Press/Getty Images
Irish patriot Roger Casement. Photo by Central Press/Getty Images

The council wrote a letter asking for the diaries to be donated to Ireland but Jeff James, the Keeper of Public Records, replied saying said that the diaries are the property of the UK.

Casement was hanged for treason in London 100 years ago today age 51, following a failed attempt to land German weapons, intended for use during the Easter Rising, at Banna Strand in Kerry.

His relatives, Patrick Casement and his wife Dr Anne Casement, travelled from their Co Antrim home to view plans for a statue in his honour in Sandycove, Co Dublin.

Events in Dublin to mark Casement's centenary today include an exhibition at Collins Barracks museum, a wreath-laying ceremony at Glasnevin, where he is buried, and an open day at Casement Aerodrome in Baldonnel, Co Dublin.

Irish Independent

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