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Thursday 28 August 2014

Light as a feather - Sarah Jessica Parker's verdict on mohawk headpiece

Published 08/05/2013 | 14:57

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NEW YORK, NY - MAY 06:  Sarah Jessica Parker attends the Costume Institute Gala for the "PUNK: Chaos to Couture" exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 6, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)
Sarah Jessica Parker sported a gold mohawk crafted by her pal, Irish milliner Philip Treacy.
NEW YORK, NY - MAY 06:  Sarah Jessica Parker attends the Costume Institute Gala for the "PUNK: Chaos to Couture" exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art on May 6, 2013 in New York City.  (Photo by Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images)
Embracing the punk theme fully, Sarah showed off a headpiece in the style of a Mohawk.

Sarah Jessica Parker's elaborate Met Gala headdress was actually "super light".

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The actress attended the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute Gala in New York City on Monday to celebrate its PUNK: Chaos to Couture exhibition.

Embracing the punk theme fully, Sarah showed off a headpiece in the style of a Mohawk.

The gold and black creation certainly caught the eye and prompted lots of questions about how she managed to wear it all night.

“It’s super light. It’s just lace!” she explained to Life&Style.

"Philip Treacy did [the headdress]. He did it last week. Giles Deacon made the dress and Mr. Louboutin designed these boots."

The actress teamed her funky accessory with a voluminous floral gown and thigh-high velvet-look boots in a tartan pattern.

“We thought that plaid kind of spoke to that [punk] era, and we didn’t want it to match. We wanted it to contrast in some way, but be meaningful. And here we are!" she smiled.

The night saw plenty of stars debut their take on punk, with Katy Perry choosing a regal outfit while Miley Cyrus rocked a netted dress and spiky hair.

Sarah revealed what the fashion movement means to her.

“It’s curiosity. It’s questions,” she divulged.

“I think about young people who maybe didn’t think that the conventional choice is something they necessarily need to abide by.”

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