Wednesday 24 May 2017

My nostalgia beats their childishness hands down

Nostalgia is simultaneously one of the greatest and one of the worst things in the world. Great because it brings you back to your youth and childhood. Worst because it makes you revert to being a child. It's the curse of my generation.

Still, it's generally benevolent and harmless -- and often good fun. Sean Moncrieff had a nice little slot on Newstalk about comic books, although not the ones most of us remember: Roy Of The Rovers, Eagle, Mandy and Judy.

He spoke to Stephen Fishler of the comicconnect.com website about one such book that had sold for a million dollars, which is amazing enough of itself. There was just one problem for the seller, however -- it wasn't theirs to sell.

A mint-condition first edition of Action Comics from the 1930s, in which Superman made his debut, is a collector's item among the comic fraternity (and yes, it usually is men). But weirdly enough, the item had been stolen from Nicolas Cage 11 years previously. Yep, that Nicolas Cage, the wacky actor guy.

Fishler studied the work and identified it as Cage's through three tiny printing dots on the cover.

ComicConnect facilitates sales of rare comics, but don't get too excited about that old box of Dandy comics in the attic: only the very few make that sort of huge money.

Meanwhile, to prove that everything really is subjective, I listened to Ivan Yates and Tom Dunne bantering about football on Breakfast (Newstalk) and I thought: "Oh, grow up."

Yes, I realise I'm a hypocrite. I accept that getting excited about Manchester United is no more inherently childish than getting excited about an old comic book.

But all this old rubbish about "we" and "you" and slagging each other off as if they have any connection at all to two sporting organisations in another country ... oy vey, turn it off.

Charlie Bird probably wanted to turn off his radio during this week's Liveline, as they discussed the negative newspaper reaction to his recent Tom Crean documentary.

Most callers were sympathetic, but then he suffered the ignominy of hearing himself being satirised by Nob Nation. Still, if you've survived the Antarctic, you can probably survive that.

dmcmanus@independent.ie

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