Tuesday 6 December 2016

JK Rowling burns an abusive Twitter troll with a clever joke about his manhood

Published 10/05/2015 | 14:26

JK Rowling has revealed her regrets over a death in the Harry Potter series
JK Rowling has revealed her regrets over a death in the Harry Potter series

JK Rowling has spoken out about the abuse she has received on Twitter following this week’s General Election in the UK.

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The author revealed that she was subjected to vicious comments on the social network from those who support Scottish Nationalist Party after she donated more than £1m to the Scottish Independence ‘No’ campaign last year.

In a number of tweets to a user on Saturday, the Harry Potter author said: “I have ignored and blocked abuse from people with an SNP twibbon [a ribbon on a Twitter avatar] for months on Twitter, very much taking the view that the abusive ones are not typical.

“This week, though, my personal line has been crossed with being called traitor and shite the least of the abuse.

“I feel no responsibility to hush up that kind of behaviour to protect the image of any political party.

“It isn’t always fun being a famous woman on Twitter and I believe in standing up to bullies.”

“I’ve favourited and responded to other really nice SNP supporters this week, too,” she tweeted.

In response to a user who wrote: “Go f**k yourself you slimy Labour ****,” Rowling wrote: “The internet doesn’t just offer opportunities for misogynistic abuse, you know. Penis enlargers can also be bought discreetly."

Meanwhile, the author is set to be the focus of a new bibliography which will give insight into how she worked her way through the entire Harry Potter series.

Author Philip Errington has spent five years writing JK Rowling: A Bibliography 1997-2013, which provides not only a complete bibliography of all her books, it also reveals her writing, and the Bloomsbury publishing, process.

The book  reveals alternative titles for Goblet of Fire ranging from Harry Potter and the Three Champions to Harry Potter and the Fire Goblet.

When it came to Bloomsbury chief executive Nigel Newton collecting the manuscript for Order of the Phoenix, he picked it up in a Fulham pub where it was handed over in a Sainsbury's carrier bag.

“So I put this bag into the back of my car and drove it home. By this stage the series was so enormous that I was almost frightened to be in physical possession of it … I shoved it under the bed," reveals Newton.

"I had another typescript sitting there … so I stuffed [the] top four pages of David Guterson’s East of the Mountains on the top and then stayed up all night reading it, which my wife did find a bit odd … There was no question of showing any of it to her. Even then I was putting bits of it in the safe.”

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