Friday 19 December 2014

Former Miss Bolivia adds some spice to art show with potted version of market

Published 07/06/2014 | 02:30

Artist and former Miss Bolivia Sonia Falcone pictured  with her piece Campo de Colore featuring 300 bowls filled with spices in the CHQ Building Dublin.
Artist and former Miss Bolivia Sonia Falcone pictured with her piece Campo de Colore featuring 300 bowls filled with spices in the CHQ Building Dublin.

Three-hundred terracotta pots filled with vivid and pungent spices, a wall stacked with worn and weathered duvets and a floating solar system complete with moss-covered planets are all on display at this year's Dublin Biennial International Art Exhibition.

Artist Sonia Falcone's vibrant ‘Campo de Color' lies at the centre of the exhibition space in Dublin's CHQ building and assaults the senses.

Inspired by the Jerusalem Market in Israel, the former Miss Bolivia spent over a year collecting spices and has stacked pots with cumin, cinnamon, Hawaiian pink salt and nutmeg. “I wanted to capture the excitement and life at a market,” Falcone told the Irish Independent.

“The colours, the textures, the tastes and the smell. I think people like that excitement, they like that heart, they want that colour.”

Falcone is just one of 50 artists showcasing their work at the second Dublin Biennial exhibition. The theme this year is ‘The Environment'.

British artist Gavin Turk's works ‘Trash' and ‘Colourful Trash' are two of the first pieces visitors will see in the 15,000 sq ft space.

“It was important that the exhibition was accessible for both art lovers and for people who don't typically go to exhibition or galleries,” founder Maggie Magee said.

“And that we had a mix of both Irish and international artists.”

Artists from Australia, Armenia, Iran, Japan and the UAE will all display their works at the exhibition, which runs from June 13-22.

Irish artist Andrew Duggan's installation ‘Hole' consist of fragments gathered from Anglo Irish Bank's derelict HQ – whose construction was halted before it could be completed – on the North Wall Quay.

“That building is really a piece of art itself,” Duggan explained. “A relic of a very specific and very significant period in Irish history.”

On the other side of the gallery, a wall has been stacked with broken cupboards drawers, duvets, mattress and old baby-grows.

The installation, ‘Forget-Me-Not', resembles a tightly packed hotpress, representing our tendency to fill our homes and our minds with artefacts and memories from the past.

Well-known Irish artist Guggi presents ‘Pots I, II, III' and said the importance of the Biennial to the Irish art world could not be underestimated. “An exhibition like this shows bravery and reignites the flame and the passion in us all,” he said.

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