Thursday 29 September 2016

The wolves of Parkgate Street: Dublin Zoo welcomes a new fearsome family

Sasha Brady

Published 22/03/2016 | 12:06

Dublin Zoo's alpha male and female wolves share an intimate moment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo's alpha male and female wolves share an intimate moment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo's new wolves get settled in to their new environment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo's new wolves get ready for feeding time. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Hear her roar! One of Dublin Zoo's new wolves shows off her impressive bark. Photo: Patrick Bolger
Dublin Zoo's new wolves get settled in to their new environment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.

Dublin Zoo has announced the arrival of eight new grey wolves.

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The new pack of wolves, which came from Osnabrück Zoo in north-west Germany, consists of an alpha male, an alpha female and their offspring.

Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.

The furry family range in age from two to ten-years-old.

In order to help the new arrivals settle in with ease, the animal care team will introduce the family to the existing pack of wolves in the coming weeks.

One of Dublin Zoo's new wolves keeps a watchful eye over his new home. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
One of Dublin Zoo's new wolves keeps a watchful eye over his new home. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo's new wolves get settled in to their new environment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.

It's important that they get to know their neighbours.

Team leader Ciarán McMahon said, “We are very pleased with these wonderful additions to Dublin Zoo. The pack arrived from Germany just two weeks ago and the wolves are showing clear signs of settling in.

"They are comfortable and confident in their new surroundings and remain close at all times.”

Despite the name, greay wolves can exist in any colour from black to white. They live in well-organised packs with a complicated social system. The whole pack travels, hunts, and raises their offspring together.

Hear her roar! One of Dublin Zoo's new wolves shows off her impressive bark. Photo: Patrick Bolger
Hear her roar! One of Dublin Zoo's new wolves shows off her impressive bark. Photo: Patrick Bolger

Grey wolves once lived in the forests of Ireland but their habitat was destroyed and they were hunted. Once the forest disappeared, the wolves disappeared.

The last wolf seen in Ireland was in County Carlow in 1786.

Dublin Zoo's new wolves get settled in to their new environment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo's new wolves get settled in to their new environment. Photo: Patrick Bolger.

Visitors to Dublin Zoo can see the grey wolves at their habitat in the Zoo. The wolves can also be observed on the Zoo webcam which is on Dublin Zoo’s website.

Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.
Dublin Zoo welcomes eight new wolves. Photo: Patrick Bolger.

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