Thursday 18 December 2014

Stripping off in Dracula
 boosted my profile in LA - Victoria Smurfit

By Elaine McCahill

Published 15/08/2014 | 07:42

Jonathan Rhys Meyers and Victoria Smurfit in ‘Dracula’
Victoria Smurfit may be disappointed that her US series 'Dracula' has been dropped – but says she’s confident that her newfound fame as a 'cougar' has opened a lot more doors for her. Photo: Andrew Downes

Irish actress Victoria Smurfit has revealed how she loved playing a sexy vampire-slayer at 40 and how stripping off has made her more recognisable in Los Angeles.

The Dublin native has said that playing Lady Jane Weatherby, who is unknowingly seduced by Dracula, was tough work physically but still such an exciting role.

"It was fantastic, I loved it, and I took secret delight in the fact that I turned 40 playing this dynamic, strong, Machiavellian, physical, sassy woman who took no prisoners," she said.

"She had so few boundaries and I loved that."

While many girls would love the chance to jump into bed with Jonathan Rhys Meyers, Victoria confessed the scenes were both demanding and that sometimes she would have a little cry before filming a scene

"The crying makes it sound a bit over-dramatic, but I believe there's a stress hormone in your tears so instead of being stressed, I'll have a little cry and get it straight out," she explained.

"Then you're not carrying anything unnecessarily emotional in the scene when you're not meant to be, because sometimes you're thrown a curveball."

However, she said she wasn't too intimidated by the nudity.

"It's just part of the job, sometimes it's part of the story, sometimes it's not and it's just gratuitous," she said.

"I'm kind of staggered by how many people did watch Dracula over in the States.

"The fans are so full of desire to get it back and they're really hard-core. That was just a new genre element to it that I've never come across which was just incredible."

Despite Dracula being cancelled 
after one season, the former Ballykisangel star admitted that landing the part was a thrill.

"When I started in the business, you couldn't imagine being able to do that 20 years down the line because it was a very different business, it was more ageist," she said.

"Now people realise that actually a vast amount of viewers don't just want kid crusaders, they want somebody they can identify with."

hnews@herald.ie

Evening Herald

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