Saturday 25 February 2017

'I feel like a complete fake, a charlatan' - Bruce Springsteen opens up about insecurities on The Late Late Show

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Independent.ie Newsdesk

Ryan Tubridy and Bruce Springsteen. Picture: The Late Late Show/RTE
Ryan Tubridy and Bruce Springsteen. Picture: The Late Late Show/RTE
Ryan Tubridy and Bruce Springsteen. Picture: The Late Late Show/RTE
Rock legend Bruce Springsteen
Bruce Springsteen concert at Slane Castle June 1985 (Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI collection.)

Bruce Springsteen has said that he still feels like a "charlatan," despite his huge success.

The Boss opened up to Ryan Tubridy on The Late Late Show on Friday night, saying he felt a "tremendous amount of pressure" when he was at the height of his fame.

"In the States we were on magazines called Time and Newsweek at the same time. In those days, these were very prestigious news magazines that did not put entertainers on their cover very often and I ended up on the cover of both. That should have been an ‘I’ve arrived’ moment but it was like ‘I’ve arrived, let me out of here! Let me get away as quick as I can!'" he said.

“I felt a tremendous amount of pressure, all of which I asked for of course, but at the same time I felt very ambivalent. I have a lot of ambivalence. Ambivalence has been one of the great signatures of my life, so, whenever those moments would arrive, instead of being able to sit back and just enjoy it, which I have to say I probably am able to do today, when I was younger I was not able to do it at all."

Ryan Tubridy and Bruce Springsteen. Picture: The Late Late Show/RTE
Ryan Tubridy and Bruce Springsteen. Picture: The Late Late Show/RTE

During the interview, which was recorded in London earlier this month, the Born in the USA singer revealed that there is always a part of him that feels like a "charlatan."

“We are all made up of insecurities so there is always some part of me that’s ‘well, yeah I’m a complete fake but I am also the realest thing you have seen in your life. I will be realer than you have ever imagined,'” he said.

“The mark of an advanced, or certainly of an adult artist, is being able to hold that paradox in your mind at the same time, hold those conflicts in your mind without letting them drive you crazy and understanding that they are just a part of living.”

Springsteen (67) also spoke about his fears that there would be a tragic accident when he played Slane Castle with the E Street Band in 1985.

Bruce Springsteen on stage during The River Tour at Croke Park in 2016
Bruce Springsteen on stage during The River Tour at Croke Park in 2016

“We hadn’t played for 90,000 before, it was the first time. We came out and the audience was rowdy and swaying this way and swaying that way, and people were dropping into little holes in the crowd."

"All I was thinking was, ‘Someone is going to get hurt and it’s going to be on me, it is going to be my responsibility’. It really concerned me very deeply and I had half of a nervous breakdown during the intermission. I think Pete Townsend was there and he said, ‘Oh yeah, that’s what it’s like!’”

Springsteen, who has previously opened up about being treated for depression in his 60s, finished by saying that his gigs in Croke Park in Dublin in May were “very satisfying”.

“It is very lovely, I am deeply appreciative and I am blessed at this point in my life to have an audience like that, to be able to perform still to the best of our abilities, to bring more glory to our band’s name and it’s a good life, I have no complaints."

Bruce Springsteen concert at Slane Castle June 1985
(Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI collection.)
Bruce Springsteen concert at Slane Castle June 1985 (Part of the Independent Newspapers Ireland/NLI collection.)

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