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Over 100 players took part in the Bray rapid chess tournament last Sunday. FIDE Master Philip Short had a great day, winning the tournament outright with 6.5 points out of 7. Conor O'Donnell, IM Mark Quinn and Stephen Morris tied for second place with 6 points each.

Published 28/06/2015 | 02:30

Over 100 players took part in the Bray rapid chess tournament last Sunday. FIDE Master Philip Short had a great day, winning the tournament outright with 6.5 points out of 7. Conor O'Donnell, IM Mark Quinn and Stephen Morris tied for second place with 6 points each.

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Two tournaments are approaching fast - the Irish Championship (July 4-12) Glorney Cup (July 19-23). The latter is a junior team tournament in which England, Scotland, Ireland and Wales compete. For more information on these and other events, visit www.icu.ie

It is often said that one of the most difficult things in chess is to win a won position. Indeed, often a player relaxes too soon, thinking that the game is already practically over. Meanwhile his opponent starts playing with renewed energy, desperately looking for any chance to avoid defeat. Often such efforts bear fruit.

The following game, played last May in the FIDE Grand Prix tournament in Khanty-Mansiysk, stands as testament to this:

Jakovenko - Gelfand

Black to play

White is clearly winning, so Gelfand tried his last chance:

48...g4!

Had he played 49.Kg3 or 49.Ke3, White would have won, but the Russian GM did not smell a rat.

49.hxg4??

This reckless move allowed Black to escape using stalemate:

49...Qg2+ 50.Ke3 Nd5+!

51.Kd4 Qf2+ 52.Kxd5 Qd4+!

53.Kxd4 Stalemate

Sunday Independent

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