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Tuesday 6 December 2016

Supersonic Review: Fans will lament at how polite and media-trained our rock stars are these days

4 stars

Hilary A White

Published 17/10/2016 | 11:27

Oasis' new documentary Supersonic
Oasis' new documentary Supersonic

It all seems like another planet, looking back. In 1995 and 1996, Gallaghermania took hold of a few influential territories as the Manchester band Oasis released their second album What’s The Story (Morning Glory).

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Bolshie, hilarious and carrying with them a potent whiff of danger to accompany their formidable catalogue of terrace anthems, the quintet became so ubiquitous that the RTE 6pm news even ran a report about a US tour cancellation. This tends not to happen with Coldplay or Muse.

At the epicentre were the Gallagher Bros, Liam and Noel. Both contribute to this charged swagger down memory lane that mainly looks at the two and a half years between being signed by Creation Records (after a chance encounter with boss Alan McGee in Glasgow) and selling out two monstrous dates in Knebworth in August ’96 (for which 4% of the UK tried to get tickets).

Neither brother can be in the same room together any longer but they put the effort in via commentary, perhaps aware Christmas is coming and the blazing mid-nineties star of Oasis is now heritage-act fodder that lends itself well to lucrative repackaging and DVD boxsets.

Cynicism aside, Supersonic is a great primer for those too young to appreciate the mass hysteria a rock band could incite before the internet came along and ruined everything. Mat Whitecross (Spike Island) mixes archive clips and animations, charting the council-estate upbringing and bully father, the meteoric rise (after the strident live energy was finally captured in the studio) and tabloid hell. Fans will beam with nostalgia and lament at how polite and media-trained our rock stars are these days. 

Cert: 15A. In selected cinemas.

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