Sunday 24 September 2017

Sculpture shows 'crucified' Doherty

The sculpture of Pete Doherty
The sculpture of Pete Doherty
Pete Doherty performing at Hyde Park, London

A life-sized sculpture of troubled rock star Pete Doherty being crucified has been unveiled at a church.

Intended to symbolise Doherty's "crucifixion" at the hands of the media during his well-documented battle with drug addiction, the unusual project, titled For Pete's Sake, was created by artist Nick Reynolds.

The Libertines frontman will loom over the aisle at Marylebone Parish Church in London until March 17, where his sculpture will be suspended as part of the Stations of the Cross exhibition.

Mr Reynolds, who is the son of the man behind the 1963 Great Train Robbery, Bruce Reynolds, began the project in 2008, when he visited the singer's studio and made a sculpt of his body.

It is the first time the statue has been seen in public.

Mr Reynolds said: "When I created this work I saw Pete being crucified by the media and that provided the basis of my inspiration to make this piece."

The statue's arrival coincides with Doherty's release of the new video to his charity single in aid of the Amy Winehouse Foundation.

He will be donating profits from his track, Flags Of The Old Regime, to the charity which aims to tackle drug and alcohol misuse among young people.

Winehouse, who became an international star with her Back To Black album, died of alcohol poisoning four years ago at the age of 27, while Doherty, 35, has had a string of high-profile battles with drug addiction.

The pair were close friends before her death and the single was written by Doherty to pay tribute to the Rehab singer, his spokesman said.

The black-and-white video was filmed at Karma Sound Studios in Thailand, where Doherty has recently had a stint in rehab.

Flags Of The Old Regime, which is available on vinyl and as a digital download, is released on March 9.

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