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Tuesday 23 September 2014

'Rowdy is good! We like rowdy' NoNoNo pay tribute to Longitude crowd

Published 20/07/2014 | 11:41

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Swedish pop trio NoNoNo are one of those bands you probably know about without realising you know about them.

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Thanks to an international Samsung as campaign their upbeat single 'Pumpin Blood' has become something of a catchy ear worm.

Playing Ireland for the first time at Longitude this weekend they were thrilled with the raucous response of a big, happy Irish crowd to not only that song but their entire set.

Michel Rocwell and Tobias Jimsom's slick production combined with Stina Wappling's vocals went down a storm.

"We're really happy," says Stina, fresh from the stage. "It's actually really cool when you come to a place for the first time and you don't know what to expect and can't really imagine that the song is actually here and the place likes it so it was really great to see the crowd and the crowd was happy."

As for the energy, Michelle adds, "I think rowdy is good! We like rowdy.  It's maybe similar to Finland.  I think Europe has a different feeling to the US.  It's more rowdy, maybe because of more alcohol.  We had people with pints in the front row.  It's the first time we have seen that.  It's pretty fun!"

The band's debut album We Are Only What We Feel has just released in Ireland on iTunes and Spotify, which makes playing festivals like Longitude all the more fun.

"When you have a body of work that people have heard it's so much more enjoyable to play.  Sometimes you can see people say, 'I really love this song' and get really into it," says Michel.

The album includes equally catchy singles 'hungry Eyes' and 'Fire Without a Flame' but it's still 'Pumpin Blood' with which we are most familiar, thanks to the aforementioned Samsung campaign and extensive 4Music promotion, something the group sees as a positive thing.

"In one way you can look at it as a tool where more people can look at the album and actually discover the other songs," says Stina.

"It's also a little bit of economic security where we can actually focus on music and not worry too much about that part of the whole thing.  I think we try to look at it as a blessing rather than 'Oh that's the only song that people know and then nothing.'  It is a blessing, if you don't get greedy!'"

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