Friday 26 May 2017

Obituary: Ben E King

Soul singer who performed with the Drifters and found fame on his own with 'Stand By Me'

: American R&B singer Ben E King, best known for the hit song 'Stand By Me', has died of a coronary related illness at the age of 76.
: American R&B singer Ben E King, best known for the hit song 'Stand By Me', has died of a coronary related illness at the age of 76.

Ben E King, who died on Friday, aged 76, was one of the senior figures of soul music, having made his mark in the 1960s, first as the lead singer of the Drifters and later with solo hits such as Spanish Harlem and, pre-eminently, Stand By Me.

The Drifters originally enjoyed considerable success in the mid-1950s when led by Clyde McPhatter, but after he left the band, their fortunes declined and the remaining members fell out with their manager, George Treadwell, the former husband of Sarah Vaughan, the jazz singer.

In 1958, Treadwell, who owned the rights to the group's name, abruptly sacked the entire line-up and replaced them with an up-and-coming outfit named the Five Crowns, one of whom was King.

The new Drifters toured for a year to a poor reception from audiences loyal to the earlier group, but their fortunes changed in mid-1959 when they recorded a song co-written and sung by King, There Goes My Baby. Produced by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, it was the first R&B track to feature orchestration, and reached No 2 in the Hot 100. Its sophisticated, Latin sound became the group's signature and propelled them to renewed popularity.

Other hits quickly followed, notably Save the Last Dance for Me, but then in 1960, King quarrelled with Treadwell over an increase in pay - his contract gave him only $100 a week, however many concerts the band did, and no share of record royalties. He, too, therefore, left the Drifters and was replaced by Rudy Lewis, who went on to sing on the group's later hits, including Up on the Roof and On Broadway. (Lewis, however, choked to death on the morning that they were due to record perhaps their best-remembered song, Under the Boardwalk, and had to be replaced by former member Johnny Moore).

Having gone it alone, King teamed up again with Leiber and Stoller and, in one afternoon, recorded both of the songs that were to be the cornerstone of the remainder of his career. Spanish Harlem, co-produced by Phil Spector, reached No 10 in the British charts (which were always receptive to King's clear baritone) in March 1961. Three months later, he released Stand By Me.

"It's a love song, it's a friendship song, it's a song where you promise anybody in need to do anything you can to help," King said. It reached No 4 in America.

Both songs helped to steer R&B away from its blues roots towards a more pop sound, and served as a template for the later work of both Spector and Motown, whose stars were soon to replace King in the public's fickle affections.

King was born Benjamin Earl Nelson in Henderson, North Carolina, on September 28, 1938. His first exposure to music was in a church choir, but in 1947, his family moved to Harlem, where he soon began singing doo-wop on street corners with three friends from school. They called themselves the Four Bs - for Ben, Billy, Billy and Bobby. King later married Betty, the sister of Billy and Bobby.

After he did well in a talent competition at the Apollo Theater in Harlem, Ben Nelson (as he was called until he began his solo career) was offered a place in the Moonglows, a well-known group of the time, but he found the pressure too great and returned to working in his father's restaurant. There he was spotted singing by the manager of the Five Crowns, and persuaded to return to the stage.

Following his heyday in the early 1960s, King's star gradually declined, with Don't Play That Song (1962) being his last substantial hit in America. Although, his two best-known numbers were revived with great success in the 1970s, first by Aretha Franklin, who took Spanish Harlem to No 2 in the US chart, and then by John Lennon, who covered Stand By Me in 1975.

By that time, King had been reduced to playing the veterans' circuit (and to appearing on the Genesis LP, The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway), and it was while performing in a Miami hotel that he was spotted by Ahmet Ertegun, the head of Atlantic, his former record label. Ertegun was impressed once more by King's voice, re-signed him, and helped him to score a Top 5 hit in the disco era with Supernatural Thing Part 1 (1975).

This revival of King's career proved to be short-lived, however, and he had to wait another decade until he once more returned to the limelight.

This came courtesy of the use of Stand By Me as the theme song to a Rob Reiner's 1986 film of the same name (based on a coming-of-age story by Stephen King). When the song was re-released that year, the single reached No 9 in the American charts, 25 years after its first placing there.

The track did even better in Britain the following year when it was used in a Levi's television commercial, on the back of which it climbed to No 1 and exposed a generation of teenagers to classic American soul. Its success led to King recording a series of LPs in the 1990s, although there proved to be little demand for them.

Nevertheless, he continued to tour regularly, occasionally with various versions of the Drifters, finding a steady audience for his highly polished renditions of some of pop's finest moments.

He married Betty (née Davis) in 1964. She survives him, with two daughters and a son.

Sunday Independent

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