Sunday 22 October 2017

'I've heard he's a lovely guy but so is my local butcher' - Dave Fanning 'baffled' by Ed Sheeran's popularity

Dave Fanning
Dave Fanning
Melanie Finn

Melanie Finn

RTE music guru Dave Fanning has revealed that Coldplay are his "guilty pleasure".

The DJ said he has a lot of time for lead singer Chris Martin and is hoping to see the chart-toppers in action at Croke Park.

"They're my guilty pleasure," he said.

"I've interviewed Chris a few times and he's kind of gauche, but he's really interested in you as a person. He asked me as many questions as I asked him.

"Sometimes I think that rock has gone up its own h*** and isn't doing so well, then I remember bands like this."

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Coldplay's Chris Martin.

However, Fanning fails to understand the popularity of stars such as Ed Sheeran, who will play a stadium tour next year.

"I'm baffled by it. I have zero interest," he said.

"I heard he's a lovely guy, but so is my local butcher and he doesn't annoy us by getting up on stage with a guitar. What's wrong with music that it's got so inoffensive and bland?"

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Ed Sheeran (Yui Mok/PA)

He continued, "Are you telling me that the Rolling Stones fought the Rock 'n' Roll war for this s*ite? Mother of God, what was the point of all of it?"

And Fanning insists that it's "not an age thing" as people right across the board relate to Sheeran – but that he's just not his cup of tea. 

"You shouldn't be going to rock gigs with your parents. The whole scene is so changed now, it's unbelievable how that is allowed.

"I wish him the best of luck but I don't understand why he's so big. And don't tell me that he's a great songwriter either. I don't actually get him. To me, it sounds like the kind of stuff that James Taylor would throw away as a B-side track," he said. 

He's now fronting a new hour-long show on RTE Radio 1 at 10pm on Tuesdays called Dave Fanning's Story of Irish Rock. 

He'll be going back to its origins with Van Morrison, moving on to Roy Gallagher and then the Showband era and Phil Lynott of Thin Lizzy fame.

"It's not the history of Irish rock, it's more my journey through the history of rock. That means I can get away with murder and nobody can give out to me," he said.

"It's just me waffling away for an hour. I interviewed Van Morrison before on the altar of a church in Bristol, strange as that sounds, and I'm going to be using a tiny bit of that for one of the shows," he said. 

Herald

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