Saturday 23 September 2017

John Meagher: Loaded

Muse performing on the Pyramid Stage during the Glastonbury Festival in Somerset. PRESS ASSOCIATION
Muse performing on the Pyramid Stage during the Glastonbury Festival in Somerset. PRESS ASSOCIATION
John Meagher

John Meagher

Much like that hardy maxim of not judging a book by its cover, it's probably advisable not to judge a movie by its trailer. Well, to hell with that: World War Z looks like a ridiculous, bloated monstrosity that has been CGI'd to death.

My willingness to despise Marc Forster's forthcoming apocalyptic horror film deepened when I learned that Muse – the world's most risibly over-the-top and overrated band – were on the soundtrack.

The thought of being trapped in a cinema with Matt Bellamy's ghastly group blaring out of those 5.1 surround-sound speakers would be enough to send most music lovers running for the hills (much like characters in the film, apparently).

But I seem to be in a minority. The rise of Muse continues unabated and there was a veritable stampede for the 15,000 tickets that were made available for a concert they played in London on Sunday following the UK premiere of Forster's movie. That the band were due to play just seven songs didn't put off the punters.

Maybe one day, I'll understand their all-encompassing popularity. Until then, I'm completely fine with a Muse-shaped hole in my life.

Q As supergroups go, this has got to be the strangest yet: Queen guitarist Brian May has assembled a band whose members include Guns N' Roses axeman Slash, sometime Massive Attack vocalist Shara Nelson and the veteran BBC wildlife documentarian, David Attenborough.

Calling themselves Artful Badger and Friends they have released a single to protest the imminent cull of badgers in England.

Badger Swagger may not represent a high point in the history of the single, but the sincerity of May et al cannot be doubted.

In fact, the most theatrical of guitarists released another song in defence of the nocturnal mammal last month: The Badger Song is inspired by the Flash Gordon theme.

Q For many of us, the now-defunct Razorlight were just as difficult to stomach as Muse are, but at least frontman Johnny Borrell added to the gaiety of our times, thanks to pronouncements that he was the next Bob Dylan and so forth

Now, he's back with a solo album boasting some of the most intriguing song titles you're likely to hear this year.

Erotic Letter and Pan-European Supermodel Song (Oh! Gina) are intriguing, but the one that's captured my attention most is Ladder to Your Bed.

Irish Independent

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