Thursday 21 September 2017

Jackson doctor 'bought anaesthetic'

The doctor charged over Michael Jackson's death bought 255 vials of a powerful anaesthetic in the three months before the singer died, a court has heard
The doctor charged over Michael Jackson's death bought 255 vials of a powerful anaesthetic in the three months before the singer died, a court has heard

The doctor charged over Michael Jackson's death bought 255 vials of a powerful anaesthetic in the three months before the singer died from a lethal combination of the drug and other sedatives, a pharmacist has testified.

Dr Conrad Murray purchased four shipments of the anaesthetic propofol between April 6 and June 10 2009, said Tim Lopez, owner of Applied Pharmacy Services in Las Vegas, where Dr Murray has a clinic.

Dr Murray bought 130 vials of propofol in 100 millilitre doses and another 125 vials in the smaller dose of 20 millilitres, Mr Lopez said while testifying at a preliminary hearing to determine if there is enough evidence for Dr Murray to stand trial after pleading not guilty to involuntary manslaughter.

A coroner's investigator previously testified that 12 vials of propofol were found in the bedroom and closet of the singer's rented mansion after his death.

Mr Lopez said Dr Murray asked him to ship some of the propofol to an address in Santa Monica, California. The address belongs to the doctor's girlfriend, although Mr Lopez testified that Dr Murray told him it was one of his clinics.

Dr Murray has told police he was concerned Jackson was addicted to propofol, and that he was trying to wean the singer from it.

In other testimony, a retired federal investigator said he had retrieved an email from Dr Murray's mobile phone containing an exchange between the doctor and a London insurance broker handling a policy for Jackson's planned series of comeback concerts.

The broker asked Dr Murray on the morning of Jackson's death to address press reports that Jackson was in poor health.

"As far as the statements of his health published by the press, let me say they're all malicious to the best of my knowledge," Dr Murray replied.

Press Association

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