Friday 19 December 2014

Glastonbury hailed 'great success'

Published 29/06/2014 | 12:42

A man takes a break from pulling his luggage trolley along in the mud at the Glastonbury Festival
A man takes a break from pulling his luggage trolley along in the mud at the Glastonbury Festival
The crowd watch The Pixies perform at the Glastonbury Festival
British designer Stella McCartney, left, walks with her sister Mary,  at Glastonbury music festival, England, Saturday, June 28, 2014. Thousands of music fans have arrived for the festival to see headliners Arcade Fire, Metallica and Kasabian. (Photo by Jonathan Short/Invision/AP)
British designer Stella McCartney, left, walks with her sister Mary, at Glastonbury. (Photo by Jonathan Short/Invision/AP)
Metallica performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Black Francis of The Pixies on stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
The crowd at The Other Stage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Festival goers Donna Howe (left) and Laura McLaughlin, from Taunton, relaxing in their tent, at Glastonbury. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
A festival goer reads the paper in front of the Pyramid stage at Glastonbury REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Malcolm Green wears a coat with luggage tags attached to it where people have written wishes on them. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Clothes laid out to dry over a camping chair at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Festivalgoers Christina Birch and Ben, aged 8, from St Albans prepare for more wet weather, at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Festivagoers in fancy dress at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Festivalgoers Emma, aged 6, and her mother Sarah, from St Albans, prepare for more wet weather at Glastonbury. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Florence Welch backstage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Alexa Chung at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
A festival goer washes her hair near the Pyramid stage. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Richard Madden and Jenna Coleman backstage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Cressida Bonas backstage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Lana del Rey smoking a cigarette whilst on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
U.S. singer Lana del Rey (L) performs on the Pyramid Stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Festivalgoers put up with the rain and mud at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Festivalgoers put up with the rain and mud at Glastonbury. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Nick Grimshaw and Daisy Lowe (left) backstage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Festival goers watch Metallica perform on the Pyramid stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
The crowd watching Robert Plant performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Laura Whitmore backstage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
John Bishop backstage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Festival goers dance to DJ Redlight at the Sonic Stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
A festival goer walks past a sign at Sonic Stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Nicky Wire of the Manic Street Preachers performing at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
James Dean Bradfield of the Manic Street Preachers performing at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire
Festival goers watch Metallica perform on the Pyramid stage at Worthy Farm in Somerset, during the Glastonbury Festival. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Robert Plant performing on the Pyramid Stage at the Glastonbury Festival, at Worthy Farm in Somerset. Photo credit: Yui Mok/PA Wire
Festival goers watch a laser show and pyrotechnics at the Arcadia arena in Worthy Farm in Somerset, on the fourth day of the Glastonbury festival REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton
Laura Carmichael (left) and Lily James backstage at the Glastonbury Festival. Photo credit: Matt Crossick/PA Wire

Glastonbury organiser Michael Eavis has hailed this year's festival as a "great success" and said he already has next year's headliners sorted.

The farmer, who put on the first festival at his farm in 1970, was sworn to secrecy about who the acts were, but said one band was not British and Prince was not among them.

Asked about Metallica's top spot on the Pyramid Stage last night, he said the heavy metallers had played "like their lives depended on it".

Michael previously defended the decision to have Metallica as one of this year's three headliners on the Pyramid Stage, saying no other band had ever been so "keen" to play.

Speaking today on the edge of his farm overlooking the vast Somerset site, he said: "I thought they put so much into it, it was like their lives depended upon it.

"They just delivered a show and people loved it.

"I promised them the chance to come about 20 years ago and so the time was now. We could give them the slot this time for the first time.

"I think they filled it very, very well. Extremely well. So I think we're lucky to have them actually."

Michael said the 44th festival had been a "great success again, in spite of the mud and everything".

"But we have had wetter years than this," he added. "Everybody loves it - the fans that come, the bands that played. The best place to be really basically."

Asked about the future of the festival, the 78-year-old, who organises the mammoth event with his daughter Emily, said: "We've got a few more years.

"Myself, I think I can run another six years, which would take me up to about 50 years.. and then see what happens after that."

Michael said he remained hopeful that Prince would one day play.

"We're always having a go at Prince, but you know it's up to him whether he wants to do it or not.

"Most of the people in the world want to play here so I did ask him to hop on the train and come down to Castle Cary station and I'll show him around the farm some time.

"It hasn't been taken up yet though."

He went on: "We've got three headliners for next year already. And that's without Prince.

"I had an agent yesterday on the platform on the stage, I was watching Metallica and he was saying my band want it next year.

"I can't tell you who they are. The band are not British."

He said he - like most people on site - was looking forward to seeing country queen Dolly Parton take to the Pyramid Stage this afternoon for what has become known as the "legend's slot".

"I'm really looking forward to hearing some of her songs live for the first time in my life," he said. "Because the records are so good. They go on and on forever."

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