Entertainment Music

Thursday 29 June 2017

Culture vulture: What not to miss this week

Top Gear
Top Gear
The Blossoms
Ed Power

Ed Power

Whether you are staying in or going out, we pick the events not to miss this week.

Going out?

The blubfest

Benjamin Francis Leftwich

With his spectral voice and downcast manner, the English singer is not exactly a happy bunny at the best of times. Following the death of his father from cancer, he endured a period of grief, confusion and soulful reflection, which is chronicled in his latest album, After the Rain - a jolting affair he will reprise on stage. Buckle up - it's going to be emotional.

Sunday, Cyprus Avenue, Cork

The indie spectacular

Blossoms

Twenty years ago, Manchester indie urchins Blossoms would have surely have achieved Brothers Gallagher-style overnight fame. But despite a chart-topping album and a flair for heartfelt psychedelic pop they remain a marginal interest - a reminder that rock'n' roll has never been further from the zeitgeist.

Thursday, Roisin Dubh, Galway

The award show

Choice Music Prize

Typically, the Choice shortlist of the year's best Irish albums has been a mixed bag of yodelling melancholics and grumbling alternative bands (nobody does grumpy quite like the unheralded Irish indie singer). However, the 2017 roll-call of nominees includes some genuine delights, such as James Vincent McMorrow's We Move and Rusangano Family's Let The Dead Bury The Dead.

Thursday, Vicar Street, Dublin

Staying in?

The game

Warlock of Firetop Mountain

A treat for retro tabletop gamers as the famed Fighting Fantasy Gamebook is reimagined as a 3D dungeon crawl, with a new interactive fighting system and Warhammer-style virtual miniatures.

Available for iPad and Android

The TV show

Top Gear

Matt LeBlanc and his creaking eyebrows have been promoted to top billing - but can the BBC's cash cow franchise really rumble onwards minus Jeremy Clarkson and crew? 8pm, BBC Two, Sunday

The box set

American Crime Story: The People Vs OJ Simpson

This retelling of the trial of the 90s deliciously melds high-minded social commentary - seldom have America's racial schisms seemed more profound - and a pulpy devotion to a good yarn. Available now on Netflix

Irish Independent

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