Saturday 1 October 2016

The original ending for Pretty Woman was supposed to be very dark and depressing

Amy Mulvaney

Published 21/07/2016 | 14:39

Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman
Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman

We're very glad it didn't end this way.

  • Go To

Following the passing of Garry Marshall, the director of Pretty Woman, on Tuesday, we look back at the original ending of the iconic film.

Pretty Woman follows the tale of Vivian Ward (Julia Roberts), a prostitute who finds love when she’s hired as an escort by wealthy businessman Edward Lewis (Richard Gere).

The ending of the 1990 classic sees the pair proclaim their love for each other and live happily ever after.

Julia Roberts and Richard Gere in Pretty Woman
Julia Roberts and Richard Gere in Pretty Woman
Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman
Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman

However, the original ending isn’t so sweet.

Firstly, the original title of the film was $3000 – the amount Edward paid to hire Vivian for a week.

Screenwriter J.F. Lawton penned the film to end with Vivian returning to the streets following her week with Edward and going on a trip to Disneyland with her best friend Kit to spend her earnings.

Seriously.

Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman
Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman

The original script also sees Vivian as a drug addict, and even Julia Roberts described it as “'a really dark and depressing, horrible, terrible story about two horrible people.”

“My character was this drug addict, a bad-tempered, foulmouthed, ill-humored, poorly educated hooker who had this weeklong experience with a foulmouthed, ill-tempered, bad-humored, very wealthy, handsome but horrible man and it was just a grisly, ugly story about these two people,” she said while on the Today Show.

The film’s ending sees Edward conquering his fear of heights and climbing up a fire escape to profess his undying love to Vivian.

In the ending for $3000, however, Vivian is on the verge of a nervous breakdown and Edward throws her out of his car when his week with her is over.

Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman
Richard Gere and Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman

Her last line to him is: “Go to hell! I hate you! I hate your money! I hate it!”

It was Garry Marshall’s signing to direct the film that changed the script, with him looking for a “fairytale”.

“My vision was a combination of fairy tales. Julia was Rapunzel, Richard was Prince Charming and Hector [Elizondo - who plays the kind hotel manager] was the fairy godmother,” he told Vanity Fair.

“The chemistry between Roberts and Gere was perfect. The actors brought such a lovability and charm that I didn’t think the audience would want a dark ending, and it didn’t hurt that I am from the school of happy endings.”

Pretty Woman went on to win a Golden Globe, receive a nomination for an Oscar and become one of the most iconic films of all time.

We’re not sure whether $3000 would have had the same success…

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Entertainment