Sunday 23 July 2017

The iconic Oscar statuette gets a makeover as it aims to look 'older'

The new-look Oscar. Photo: The Academy Awards / Twitter
The new-look Oscar. Photo: The Academy Awards / Twitter
A giant Oscar statue outside the 2015 Academy Awards. Photo: PA
Meryl Streep and the current Oscar design.

Sasha Brady

The Academy Awards has announced that the iconic Oscar statuette is getting a makeover.

Like many of the nominees attending the awards ceremony, the Oscar will be debuting a new look.

A giant Oscar statue outside the 2015 Academy Awards. Photo: PA
A giant Oscar statue outside the 2015 Academy Awards. Photo: PA

However, unlike the stars, he won't be trying to remove wrinkles and fine lines in an effort to appear more youthful.

In fact, the Oscar statuette will be aiming to look older - in a nod to the 'golden era' of Hollywood.

Meryl Streep and the current Oscar design.
Meryl Streep and the current Oscar design.

The mini makeover comes after a new company has been appointed designer of the coveted statues.

New York-based Polich Tallix Fine Art Foundry took over production from Chicago-based R.S. Owens & Company, which had made the statues since 1982.

The new-look Oscar. Photo: The Academy Awards / Twitter
The new-look Oscar. Photo: The Academy Awards / Twitter

The Academy says the new manufacturer has "restored subtle features" from the original sculpture, using a cast bronze example from 1929, the first year the award was given.

It also treated fans to some 'behind-the-scenes' images and revealed that it takes the company approximately three months to make 50 statues.

And speaking of Oscar, it appears the Academy doesn't quite know how the award ended up with its nickname.

"Officially named the Academy Award of Merit, the statuette is better known by its nickname, Oscar. While the origins of the moniker aren't clear, a popular story has it that upon seeing the trophy for the first time, Academy librarian (and eventual executive director) Margaret Herrick remarked that it resembled her Uncle Oscar," it said in a statement.

"The Academy didn't adopt the nickname officially until 1939, but it was widely known enough by 1934 that Hollywood columnist Sidney Skolsky used it in a piece referring to Katharine Hepburn's first Best Actress win."

Thew new look will be showcased when

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