Thursday 8 December 2016

Gig to follow screening of music scene documentary at Glasgow Film Festival

Published 28/11/2016 | 10:06

Alex Kapranos will perform at the special gig
Alex Kapranos will perform at the special gig

A live music performance involving Alex Kapranos, Stuart Braithwaite and Emma Pollock is to be part of next year's Glasgow Film Festival (GFF).

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The gig will follow a special screening of documentary Lost In France, which looks at the rise of Scotland's independent music scene, involving bands such as Mogwai, Arab Strap and Franz Ferdinand.

Held at Glasgow's ABC, the film and performance will be screened live to cinemas across the UK on February 21, with the first festival tickets going on sale on Wednesday.

The 2017 programme is also to celebrate Canadian cinema and the role of women in thrillers, with two strands titled True North: New Canadian Cinema and Dangerous Dames.

GFF organisers said t he Dangerous Dames retrospective will be free to the public and include films such as Out Of The Past and Chinatown.

The thirteenth annual GFF will run from February 15 to 26 next year, with the full programme to be launched in January.

Co-director Allan Hunter said: "Dangerous Dames is a collection of some of the finest film noir thrillers ever made. Dark, twisted tales of murder and revenge built around complex starring roles for some of Hollywood's most powerful women.

"The retrospective ranges from Mary Astor's scheming Brigid in the classic The Maltese Falcon to Faye Dunaway's enigmatic Evelyn at the heart of Roman Polanski's Chinatown."

The festival's other director, Allison Gardner, said: "2017 is a big year for Canada as it commemorates the 150th anniversary of its confederation.

"We wanted the GFF to be part of those celebrations and that's why our country focus for this year is Canada. We want to reflect the bigger picture of all the exciting diversity in Canadian filmmaking from thrilling new talents to stunning animation.

"We have also delved into the archives for a vision of yesteryear hipsters from 1950s Toronto. I think audiences will love this window into a filmmaking nation that is often unsung in British cinemas."

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