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Sunday 25 September 2016

Guinness Book of Records - how Ireland contributes to its success

Ciara Treacy

Published 27/08/2015 | 02:30

Most Where's Wallys: 3657 people descended on Merrion Square in Dublin in June 2011 dressed in the cartoon character’s trademark striped jumper and oversized glasses
Most Where's Wallys: 3657 people descended on Merrion Square in Dublin in June 2011 dressed in the cartoon character’s trademark striped jumper and oversized glasses
The tallest man in medical history remains Robert Pershing Wadlow from the US, who when last measured in 1940 was 8ft 11.1in tall
Best-selling act who hasn't played a concert: Singer/songwriter Enya has sold 70 million solo albums across the world, but has yet to bring her talent to the stage
Longest-serving altar boy: Tommy Kinsella

From the largest high-heeled shoe to the most people throwing flip-flops simultaneously, the book which documents it all has broken a record of its own today.

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On this day 60 years ago, the first edition of the Guinness World Records book was published and it has since become the bestselling annual book and copyrighted title in history.

To date, more than 134 million print copies and three million e-books have been sold in 21 different languages and more than 100 countries - enough to wrap around the Earth's equator.

In the UK and US alone, it boasts a 97pc recognition rate among the general public.

Ireland has contributed significantly to the success, as according to experts it has historically always been in the top 10 in terms of applications.

In the past 12 months, Irish people have submitted 462 applications out of 40,000 worldwide.

The mission of Guinness World Records "aims to inspire ordinary people to do extraordinary things" and it aims to offer fairness in record breaking for everyone, everywhere.

It is now one of the most recognised brands in the world and in 2014 sent judges to over 63 countries to adjudicate events run by charities, governments, schools and individuals.

Most heavily broken records include longest DJ marathon, the heaviest item lifted with glue, and the most bobbed apples in one minute.

The oldest person in the world is also broken regularly and is currently held by Jeanne Louise Calment, who lived to be 122 years and 164 days old.

Some records have withstood the test of time, such as 'Gone with the Wind' (1939), which remains the highest grossing movie in the world with a total gross of €3.04bn.

Meanwhile, the tallest man in medical history remains Robert Pershing Wadlow from the US, who when last measured in 1940 was 8ft 11.1in tall.

Some have made it a life goal to break as many records as they can, including American Ashrita Furman, who at last count had more than 125 current world record titles.

Among his achievements include the record for long-distance pogo-stick jumping, most glasses balanced on the chin and most hop-scotch games in 24 hours.

Anyone interested in applying to break a record can submit evidence of their accomplishments free-of-charge online and if successful, will receive a much-coveted certificate to confirm their record.

Longest-serving altar boy: Tommy Kinsella worked at Church of the Holy Redeemer in Bray, Co Wicklow, from 1917 aged 11 until his death in 1999.

Largest gathering of people dressed as the Hulk: The Muckno Mania Festival in Castleblayney, Co Monaghan, hosted 574 participants dressed as the green man in 2012.

Heaviest duck egg: The heaviest duck egg was laid in 1999 by a White Pekin duck owned by Willie and Kitty Costello of Tuam, Co Galway. It weighed 227g and measured 14cm, with a circumference of 20cm.

Tallest windmill: St Patrick's Windmill Tower in Dublin, now without sails, is the tallest windmill in the world at 150ft.

Irish Independent

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