Saturday 1 October 2016

Former Wall Street trader says male co-workers mooed at her after she returned from maternity leave

Published 01/02/2016 | 11:24

Maureen Sherry
Maureen Sherry
Maureen Sherry worked at Bear Stearns for 11 years and says she witnessed horrific levels of sexism in the world of finance.

A former Wall Street trader has revealed that fellow male workers ‘mooed’ at her after she returned from maternity leave and stuck torn underwear to her computer screen after her honeymoon.

  • Go To

Another colleague drank the breast milk which she had stored in the office fridge and openly boasted about it.

Maureen Sherry worked at Bear Stearns for 11 years and says she witnessed horrific levels of sexism in the world of finance and she has lifted the lid on the experience in a new novel.

In an explosive new book, a thinly fictionalised account of her days as a female Wall Street trader, Ms Sherry reveals the levels of sexism which are experienced by women in the male-dominated world of high finance.

Maureen Sherry worked at Bear Stearns for 11 years and says she witnessed horrific levels of sexism in the world of finance.
Maureen Sherry worked at Bear Stearns for 11 years and says she witnessed horrific levels of sexism in the world of finance.

Women being interviewed for jobs are routinely subjected to invasive questioning regarding their marriage status and whether they plan to have children, she says.

On her first day in the bank, when Sherry opened up a pizza box she found it was full of condoms - a prank by a male colleague.

Her forthcoming novel, “Opening Belle”, lifts the lid on life on Wall Street and tells of men debating whether a new female candidate should be hired based on their looks. One female candidate sees breasts drawn at the top of her CV.

However, Sherry insists her life on Wall Street hasn't left her scarred.

“A lot of it was pranks. I never got groped.”

But she added: “When I first returned from maternity leave,” Sherry says, “there was this feeling that, ‘You should be home with your child’ — unless it’s a financial necessity to keep your family off the bread line.”

 “The disparity of gender pay is exactly the same,” Sherry says. “Young female traders are frustrated that they’ve done all the right things, yet are still doubted about their ‘commitment to the job’ ” — code for marriage and babies.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Entertainment