Wednesday 28 September 2016

Award-winning journalist Martina Devlin returns to bookshelves with new novel 'About Sisterland'

Jane O'Faherty

Published 09/09/2015 | 23:01

Martina Devlin at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Martina Devlin at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Cousins Julia Kelly & Judy Kelly, at the launch of Martina Devlin's new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Fintan Vallely & Catherine Dunne, at the launch of Martina Devlin's new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Anthony Glavin & Claudia Carroll, at the launch of Martina Devlin's new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Martina Devlin with British Ambassador to Ireland Dominick Chilcott at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Martina Devlin with Se?n Moncrieff at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips

Award-winning journalist and columnist Martina Devlin is returning to bookshelves with a new dystopian novel.

  • Go To

'About Sisterland' is Ms Devlin’s ninth published book, and focuses on a futuristic society where women hold all power and men are subordinates.

Martina Devlin with her husband David Murphy at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips
Martina Devlin with her husband David Murphy at the launch of her new book ‘About Sisterland’, at the Irish Writers Centre, Parnell Square, Dublin. 9/9/2015 Picture by Fergal Phillips

The novel follows the story of Constance, who is selected to reproduce by the rulers of Sisterland. During that process, she meets a man for the first time and begins to question her stifled life under the regime.

Ms Devlin said she drew on her own upbringing in Northern Ireland while writing the novel.

“I grew up in a society where people were really kept apart – Catholics and Protestants in this case,” she said.

“I was struck by how extremism has a chance to put down roots – when two sides don’t get to know each other as human beings.”

She added that the work also highlighted a need for tolerance rather than totalitarianism.

“I suppose what I think is the human spirit has an innate capacity to overcome taught ideas about who you should love and how you should live, and just to put common humanity first.”

“We saw that with the same sex marriage referendum, for example.”

Newstalk presenter Sean Moncrieff launched 'About Sisterland' at the Irish Writer’s centre, and said the book showed how extremism often starts with the best of intentions.

“I have a suspicion that it’s one of those books that people will have endless debates about – what they found in it, and how they interpreted it,” he added.

Online Editors

Read More

Promoted articles

Editors Choice

Also in Entertainment