Tuesday 26 September 2017

From 'Dover and out' to stealing Donegal, how the press reacted to Britain triggering Article 50

The Guardian's front page
The Guardian's front page

Sasha Brady

Here's how the media reacted as Britain prepares to trigger Article 50 today.

British Prime Minister Theresa May has signed a letter to trigger Article 50, beginning a complex two-year process that will see the UK leave the European Union.

This is how the press reacted to the move.

The Guardian's front page registers the uncertainty people are feeling but as "Britain steps into the unknown" it seems to be taking Donegal, Roscommon and parts of Cavan with it - according to the newspaper's front page picture of Britain cut out from a jigsaw puzzle of Europe.

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The stealing of the Irish counties didn't go unnoticed by Twitter.

 

The Times calls the move the beginning of a journey to the "biggest political shake-up since the Second World War".

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The Sun newspaper has beamed its headline across the Cliffs of Dover, as a goodbye message to its European neighbours.

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'Freedom' chirps the Daily Mail as it refers to the move as a "historic day for Britain".

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The Daily Mirror is looking towards a "bright future".

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The Daily Express is joyous with its break-up letter to the EU.

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The i paper illustrates a more accurate map than the Guardian's puzzle with its dotted-line around the UK, saying that Europe will "block any deal" unless its citizens can continue to move to Britain.

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The Daily Telegraph is uniting behind Theresa May.

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The Star's not too bothered.

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In France, Le Monde wrote: "Brexit, the consequences of the break."

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Germany's Der Spiegel takes a sombre stance with a gloomy front page image of London: "Dramatic times in a wonderful city."

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Portugal's Publico leads with Big Ben looming over a shadowed image of Winston Churchill.

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Spain's El Pais thinks London had sparked a process that would “mark the future of Europe". It adds: "We leave poetry behind from today onwards, it's time for prose."

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