Friday 9 December 2016

Yeoman ends year with €3.3m debt

Published 17/08/2010 | 05:00

FINANCE

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PAUL Coulson's Yeoman Corporate Finance finished its 2009/10 year with net liabilities of more than €3.3m but insisted it had enough shareholder support to remain a "going concern". The firm is ultimately owned by Luxembourg-based Yoeman Capital, and the accounts show the bulk of the Irish firm's debts are owed to group companies. Mr Coulson was one of the major beneficiaries from the 2006 sale of the Glass Bottle Site.

Poor form pushes Celtic debt to £4m

SOCCER

Celtic's debts increased by more than £4m (€4.9m) in the last financial year as a result of 'unacceptable results' under former manager Tony Mowbray. The Scottish Premier League club posted a loss before taxation of £2.1m, and also showed a 15pc drop in annual turnover, after making a profit of £2m the previous year.

Investors demand gold as safe haven

PRECIOUS METALS

Gold prices rose to a six-week high on signs the global economy is faltering, boosting demand for the metal as a protector of wealth. Japan's economy grew at less than a fifth of the pace economists estimated last quarter, pushing it into third place behind the US and China. Gold prices have gained for two straight weeks on demand for the metal as a haven.

Barclays charged over illegal deals

Bank FINE

Barclays Bank has agreed to pay $298m over criminal allegations that it illegally engaged in financial transactions with banks in Cuba, Iran, Libya, Sudan and Burma, the US Justice Department disclosed in court papers filed yesterday. The countries are all under economic and trade sanctions by the US government.

Dollar falls as confidence firms

CURRENCIES

The US dollar fell against major currencies yesterday as early negative sentiment stemming from weak Japanese growth data dissipated and traders decided the currency's rally last week was too fast. US stocks recovered from an earlier decline on global economic worries sparked by the disappointing Japanese data. That saw the greenback give up some of last week's gains when risk aversion had pushed it up more than 3pc against a basket of currencies.

Irish Independent

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