Friday 9 December 2016

Probably not the best lager but aiming to be biggest

Peter Flanagan in Copenhagen

Published 06/04/2011 | 05:00

Carlsberg brewmaster Jens Eiken displays a bottle of what is billed the world's most expensive beer, in a cellar beneath an old brewery in Copenhagen. A 37.5 centilitre bottle of Vintage No.1 fetches 2008 kroner (€269)
Carlsberg brewmaster Jens Eiken displays a bottle of what is billed the world's most expensive beer, in a cellar beneath an old brewery in Copenhagen. A 37.5 centilitre bottle of Vintage No.1 fetches 2008 kroner (€269)

IT HAS been one of the most popular tag lines in Irish advertising, but from yesterday Carlsberg is no longer 'probably the best lager in the world'.

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Danish brewer Carlsberg Group is dropping the slogan as part of an ambitious repositioning of the Carlsberg brand, with the aim of doubling profits within the next four years. In its place, the company will use 'That calls for a Carlsberg', as it aims to move the brand into a premium space.

Carlsberg Group does not break out financial results for Carlsberg beer itself, but chief executive Jorgen Buhl Rasmussen said doubling the profit from the drink by 2015 was ambitious, and he was confident it could be achieved.

"It will not only be achieved through the rebranding. We are also increasing efficiencies in our own business. While the target is very ambitious, we also feel it is very realistic.

"We want to be the fastest growing brewer in the world and achieving that means growing our front line through efficiencies and trying to grow all our brands," he added.

"People are familiar with Carlsberg but do not necessarily know what it represents. Although international recognition is good, it is not enough."

The decision to ditch the 'Probably' slogan brings to an end one of the most famous slogans in advertising that was originally voiced by Orson Welles.

While the tag line may be retained in some markets, such as the UK, it is not expected to be kept in Ireland.

The new campaign is being carried out across all media.

In a statement, the company said the new tag line came from the idea of encouraging consumers to 'reward' themselves with the beer.

Carlsberg has also changed its recipe for the beer to include a new barley, which it claims will allow the beer to last longer without changing the taste.

The Danish company's decision to reposition the brand comes at a time when the drinks industry is struggling to maintain gains made prior to the global economic downturn, with Western Europe in particular hit hard, as evidenced by recent results from Guinness maker Diageo.

Irish Independent

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