Friday 24 March 2017

Goldman Sachs chiefs face wrath of US Senate

Protesters stand up in the hearing room wearing prison garb and carrying masks of Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein
and Goldman Sachs executive director Fabrice Tourre during the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs
Investigations subcommittee hearing on 'Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: The Role of Investment Bank' on Capitol Hill in
Washington yesterday
Protesters stand up in the hearing room wearing prison garb and carrying masks of Goldman Sachs chairman and CEO Lloyd Blankfein and Goldman Sachs executive director Fabrice Tourre during the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Investigations subcommittee hearing on 'Wall Street and the Financial Crisis: The Role of Investment Bank' on Capitol Hill in Washington yesterday

The conduct of Goldman Sachs during the financial meltdown was assailed yesterday by a US Senate panel, which accused the Wall Street powerhouse of inflating the housing bubble earlier this decade and then profiting from its collapse in 2007.

Goldman Sachs officials, facing accusations that they had hurt clients, lenders and the overall economy, sought to defend themselves in the firm's biggest showdown with the US government since it became a public company a decade ago.

Fabrice Tourre, the sole Goldman employee charged in a government fraud lawsuit against the firm, said in testimony that he did not hide material information from clients.

Senior managers also said they were not prescient about the housing market, just diligent about limiting its risk.

The subcommittee, examining the causes of the financial crisis, launched a broad fusillade against investment banks.

Goldman helped to package toxic mortgages into bonds for fees from 2004 to 2007, and then repackaged those bonds into complex securities known as collateralised debt obligations, magnifying the risk from the mortgages, the subcommittee said.

Goldman Sachs then shorted the mortgage market, betting on its decline throughout 2007. It did not disclose its position to clients, the subcommittee said, and sold securities it wanted to get off its books to clients.

The subcommittee also pointed to a particular trade in which Goldman failed to disclose key information to a ratings analyst and investors.

"Goldman's actions demonstrate that it often saw its clients not as valuable customers but as objects for profits," said Senator Carl Levin, chairman of the Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.

"Its conduct brings into question the whole function of Wall Street," Levin added.

Irish Independent

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