Friday 30 September 2016

Froome says cycling has given sports the template to fight doping

Tom Rooney

Published 04/11/2015 | 02:30

Team Sky's Chris Froome pictured on the Centre Stage during the Web Summit in the RDS
Team Sky's Chris Froome pictured on the Centre Stage during the Web Summit in the RDS

Tour de France winner Chris Froome believes the doping problems which have plagued cycling have been greatly diminished thanks to the increased vigilance of those policing the sport.

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Cycling was sent into a tailspin of negativity in 2012, when the US Anti-Doping Agency revealed that Lance Armstrong and many other elite cyclists had been engaged in the long-term use of performance-enhancing drugs.

The sport has been struggling to redeem its reputation since, but Team Sky's Froome, who won this year's Tour de France and the 2013 event, says that the issue has been addressed rigorously by the relevant bodies and that cycling is now at the vanguard of doping prevention.

"The anti-doping movement has been a massive part of the sport's evolution over the last 10 years, especially moving on from the Lance Armstrong era," he said.

"We all know what was happening back then. The anti-doping movement has been a massive part of the sport's evolution."

The 30-year-old said the tenacity of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) and the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI) in tandem with the development of the biological passport had made it near impossible for would-be cheats to go unnoticed.

Rugby star Jamie Heaslip was also speaking at the event and said coaches were increasingly wary of spies leaking information about training techniques.

Irish Independent

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