Tuesday 6 December 2016

Under 1pc of Irish households say there's no broadband available to them - CSO

Published 16/12/2015 | 11:56

No matter how high the broadband speed advertised by a provider in your area is, if your home doesn't have a good enough broadband connection, you could only get a tiny fraction of the speed you were expecting
No matter how high the broadband speed advertised by a provider in your area is, if your home doesn't have a good enough broadband connection, you could only get a tiny fraction of the speed you were expecting

85pc of Irish homes have access to the internet at home, according to the latest figures from the Central Statistics Office.

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Of 15pc left without it, 14pc say that they “do not need the internet” or that do not have the skills to operate it, with some saying it’s too expensive for them to purchase.

Just 0.8pc of Irish households say that there is no broadband available in their locality.

The figures represent a snapshot of online activity but do not include Irish online use within mobile apps, which now take up the majority of Irish internet activity.

According to the CSO figures, email remains the single most common type of activity used by Irish home internet users, with 84pc using it. The next most common activity is “social networking” at 66pc. The CSO does not say whether messaging services such as Whatsapp are part of this activity.

Two thirds of respondents to the CSO’s survey say that they conduct internet banking at home, while 53pc say that they use “services related to travel”.

Meanwhile, 40pc of who stated that they had purchased online in the last three months indicated they had made between one and two purchases in this period. The most common types of internet purchases made by individuals in the last 12 months were clothes or sports goods (31pc), travel arrangements (29pc) and event tickets (29pc).

44pc of us use online storage, such as Dropbox or Google Drive, to store photos, videos and documents.

The CSO figures are not a complete representation of Irish online usage as they do not specifically take mobile apps into account. Recent data from telecoms regulator Comreg shows that Irish mobile phones have become internet data devices rather than voice communication machines, with the amount of traffic from mobile data overtaking voice calls for the first time.

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