Business Technology

Wednesday 28 June 2017

Twitter launching 'official' Android app

Microblogging site will launch its own Android client and link shortener

Twitter's chief executive, Evan Williams, has confirmed that the company will be launching its own link shortener and Google Android app. Photo: Getty Images
Twitter's chief executive, Evan Williams, has confirmed that the company will be launching its own link shortener and Google Android app. Photo: Getty Images

Claudine Beaumont

Twitter has confirmed that it will be launching an 'official' Twitter application for Google Android devices.

Evan Williams, co-founder of the microblogging site, said that the company had decided to make its own Twitter clients because new users were finding it difficult to find the right software.

"We need to address these markets in a better way," he told the audience at Chirp, Twitter's annual developer conference.

"We found we were under-serving users. We realised we had to have a core experience on these major platforms just like we do on the web, otherwise we are failing users."

Williams did not say whether the Twitter team would build the client in-house, or acquire the technology from another company, such as Swift or Twidroid, which are both popular third-party apps for Android devices.

Last week, Twitter acquired Tweetie for the Apple iPhone, and it has also collaborated with Research in Motion to build an official app for the BlackBerry.

He tried to allay developers' fears, by saying that greater clarity in the app space would benefit everyone.

"The best thing we can do for you guys is to grow the user base to hundreds of millions of new users," he said.

Twitter, which has more than 105 million registered users, also said it would launch its own link shortener, to rival those offered by the likes of Bit.ly and TinyURL.

Most Twitter clients feature a built-in link shortener that automatically condenses web addresses to help keep messages within the 140 character limit.

Williams said it would be "stupid" for Twitter not to offer its own link shortener.

"Everyone else has solved that problem. We are probably not going to give people a choice. If they want to use a different shortener, they can use a different app."

Telegraph.co.uk

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