Business Technology

Thursday 28 August 2014

Revolutionary TCD magnet discovery to attract tech firms

Adrian Weckler

Published 02/07/2014 | 02:30

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Scientists at Trinity College have announced what they describe as a “revolutionary” new material for technology manufacturers and data storage companies
Scientists at Trinity College have announced what they describe as a “revolutionary” new material for technology manufacturers and data storage companies

SCIENTISTS at Trinity College have announced what they describe as a “revolutionary” new material for technology manufacturers and data storage companies.

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The material is being described as “a strange new magnet” that could make the transfer of data much quicker and allow for “limitless” data storage, according to the researchers.

Made up of manganese, ruthenium and gallium, the “magnet” could also cut out the process of wiping data via other types of magnets, which is a common problem for IT manufacturers.

“Magnetic materials are what make reading and storing data, either on personal devices or in data centres, possible,” said Professor Michael Coey, of Trinity's Advanced Materials and BioEngineering Research Centre (Amber).

“Magnets are at the heart of every electronic device we use, from computers and laptops to tablets, smartphones and digital cameras. Given its unique insensitivity to magnetic fields, this could have major implications for the future development of electronics, information technology and a host of other applications.”

He said researchers worldwide have grappled with how to create such a magnet without flouting the basic principles of physics.

He said that the Trinity researchers have solved this problem by using processes for making the electronic circuits on silicon chips. adding that in this way, it could be adopted by computer and electronics companies easily.

Funding

The Amber project is one |of several bodies to receive |€100m in cash from the State |as part of Science Foundation Ireland's (SFI) funding scheme.

“SFI Research Centres like Amber were established with a focus on delivering cutting edge, internationally excellent research, which will deliver real benefit to the economy and to industry,” said Professor Mark Ferguson, director general of SFI and chief scientific adviser to the Government.

“This discovery absolutely fits the bill and I congratulate Professor Coey and his |team. Their discovery is a world first.”

Irish Independent

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