Business Technology

Friday 30 September 2016

Quarter of rural broadband users say they would move to a bigger town or city to get service

Published 25/05/2016 | 12:34

Picture shows from left Anne O’Leary, CEO of Vodafone Ireland ;with students Mae Looney,6th Class;Orla Looney,4th Class;Pauline Dunne, Principal; Niamh O’Sullivan,6th Class,from Ratheniska National School On Co. Laois communicating with their school friends at the launch of Connected Futures: Bridging Ireland’s Urban-Rural Divide.
Picture shows from left Anne O’Leary, CEO of Vodafone Ireland ;with students Mae Looney,6th Class;Orla Looney,4th Class;Pauline Dunne, Principal; Niamh O’Sullivan,6th Class,from Ratheniska National School On Co. Laois communicating with their school friends at the launch of Connected Futures: Bridging Ireland’s Urban-Rural Divide.

A quarter of rural broadband users have said they would move to a bigger town or city to access a service, according to the results of a new survey.

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The survey, of 1,000 people outside Ireland’s biggest cities, suggests that Ireland’s digital divide now threatens rural infrastructure at an accelerated pace.

Read more: Rural broadband delays put us at bottom of EU table, prices double EU average

The Amarach survey says that at least one in five Irish homes has no broadband access at all. Of those that do, almost half of households outside towns say that their broadband speed is not sufficient to perform ordinary tasks.

Read more: A rural fashion shop needs optimal connectivity to reach customers and suppliers

And one in five say that they are forced to go to venues outside the home to access the internet.

Meanwhile, one third say that slow and unreliable internet speeds currently prevent them and family members from working from home and that their internet speed at home isn’t fast enough for all their family requirements.

The report, Connected Futures: Bridging Ireland’s Urban-Rural Divide was produced by Amárach for Vodafone Ireland.

It says that nearly one in four rural householders uses the internet at home in relation to their work, while nearly 150,000 of these choose to avoid commuting some or all of the time because they can connect to work through the internet.

 

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