Saturday 1 October 2016

US tech giants claim data rules not fit for purpose

Published 21/10/2015 | 02:30

Minister Richard Bruton T.D. Joins Microsoft to mark the start of construction of Microsoft's new €134m Campus
Minister Richard Bruton T.D. Joins Microsoft to mark the start of construction of Microsoft's new €134m Campus

There was a mixed reaction to yesterday's High Court case, with some US companies insisting that the issue does not impact their data-transfer arrangements from Europe to the US.

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Facebook continues to argue that the ongoing case does not relate to its arrangements for transferring of data.

This would seem to fly in the face of both Mr Justice Hogan's remarks and the substance of the European Court Of Justice ruling two weeks ago. However, tech giant Microsoft has called for data-collection practices by authorities to be reviewed.

"The decision made clear what many have been advocating for some time," wrote Brad Smith, president and chief legal officer of the company.

"Legal rules that were written at the dawn of the personal computer are no longer adequate for an era with ubiquitous mobile devices connected to the cloud. In both the United States and Europe, we need new laws adapted to a new technological world." Mr Smith made his remarks as Apple chief executive Tim Cook castigated US security authorities for seeking "back doors" into consumer data services.

"You can't have a back door in the software because you can't have a back door that's only for the good guys," said Mr Cook.

US security authorities tapping into consumer web services was a central part of the European Court Of Justice's striking down of the Safe Harbour protocol.

Irish Independent

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