Tuesday 27 September 2016

Online mapping tool to inform 'better decisions'

Published 04/11/2015 | 02:30

GeoHive uses information from the Central Statistics Office, local authorities, government departments, the Office of Public Works, the National Transport Authority and the Environmental Protection Agency, amongst others, and allows users to create customised maps on mobile, tablet and desktop devices which can be saved or shared on social media
GeoHive uses information from the Central Statistics Office, local authorities, government departments, the Office of Public Works, the National Transport Authority and the Environmental Protection Agency, amongst others, and allows users to create customised maps on mobile, tablet and desktop devices which can be saved or shared on social media

Buying a house but worried about crime rates in your prospective neighbourhood?

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Or perhaps you're thinking about establishing a business, but want to see what the competition is like in a particular area?

A new, free mapping tool launched by Ordnance Survey Ireland (OSI) aims to bring this level of information to a wider audience, using data collected by a range of public bodies and linking it to geographical maps.

GeoHive uses information from the Central Statistics Office, local authorities, government departments, the Office of Public Works, the National Transport Authority and the Environmental Protection Agency, amongst others, and allows users to create customised maps on mobile, tablet and desktop devices which can be saved or shared on social media.

"GeoHive is designed to allow users to join or mash up information on a map, providing a deeper understanding of topics that impact our lives," OSI chief executive Colin Bray said.

"Accurate information helps us all make better decisions."

OSI has also developed specific 'story maps', including one called 'Buying Property in Ireland' which sets out sales data, available local public services including schools and healthcare centres, transport links, zoning maps of nearby land and information about the age of properties.

A 'Dog Control Information' map shows where the most dogs in Ireland live - Cork - and also notes the gap between the number licensed, and those believed to live in the State.

OSI estimates up to €4.5m a year is being lost in licensing fees because owners refuse to register their pets.

Irish Independent

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