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Friday 25 July 2014

No mobile phones allowed on US bound flights unless charged

Mark O'Regan

Published 06/07/2014|21:44

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The Transportation Security Administration said it will require some foreign airports to order passengers to turn on devices such as mobile phones
The Transportation Security Administration said it will require some foreign airports to order passengers to turn on devices such as mobile phones

Mobile phones and laptops will be banned from planes heading for the US if they are not charged up, amid heightened fears of an imminent terrorist attack.

Both the Dublin Airport Authority and Aer Lingus have confirmed they are noting the new guidelines

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And last night it emerged that passengers at Dublin airport may soon be forced to turn on electronic devices to prove they are real at security in light of mounting threats of an Al-Qaeda bomb attack.

Both the Dublin Airport Authority and Aer Lingus have confirmed they are noting the new guidelines.

The security clampdown may mean passengers will have to undergo “vigorous” body searches.

The Dublin Airport Authority (DAA) told the Irish Independent that it is “liaising with the Department of Transport in relation to any proposed changes regarding aviation security at Irish airports.”

Aer Lingus said it is “looking into the new regulations and will advise customers accordingly.”

The move comes as airport security in the UK, America and other countries is ramped up amid concerns that al-Qaeda extremists based in Yemen plan to use British and other Western jihadists fighting in Syria and Iraq as suicide bombers.

Laptops, tablet computers and other electronic devices will also be banned from planes if they cannot be turned on.

US officials have singled out smartphones including iPhones made by Apple Inc and Galaxy phones made by Samsung Electronics Co Ltd for extra security checks on US-bound direct flights from Europe, the Middle East and Africa.

Last week, beefed-up security at foreign airports with direct flights to the US was requested by Jeh Johnson, the American secretary of homeland security.

Intelligence suggests that al-Qaeda in Yemen and its master bomb maker Ibrahim Hassan al-Asiri, have linked up with jihadists in Syria and passed on bomb-making expertise.

And there has been resistance to the measures, with some UK passengers complaining of hour-long queues through clogged security gates.

When the increased security took effect last week, travellers were subjected to “vigorous” body searches and clothing and shoes were swabbed for traces of explosive.

Irish Independent

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