Friday 2 December 2016

Exploding Samsung phones won't be recalled in Ireland

Published 11/10/2016 | 02:30

A Samsung Note7 phone set up in a laboratory in South Korea for a test. REUTERS/Edgar Su
A Samsung Note7 phone set up in a laboratory in South Korea for a test. REUTERS/Edgar Su

Samsung has no plans for a new recall of its exploding Note7 phone in Ireland, despite fresh reports of explosions and overheating batteries.

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The embattled manufacturer says it plans to go ahead with sales of the controversial phone here, despite a lack of commitment from mobile operators to offer the device to customers.

A woman speaks on an phone as she passes an advert for the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in London. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor
A woman speaks on an phone as she passes an advert for the Samsung Galaxy Note 7 in London. REUTERS/Luke MacGregor

Both Vodafone and Three say they have not yet decided whether they will sell the €800 Note7, while agents for Meteor say it will be available later this month. A spokeswoman for Three said that some of its customers were provided with replacement Note7 phones after the initial manufacturer recall.

But in the last week, several replacement Note7 models in the US have reportedly caught fire, including one that resulted in a commercial plane being evacuated.

The problems have resulted in an increasing number of US mobile phone operators taking the Note7 off customer shelves because of customer-safety reasons, while airlines are warning against bringing the phones on board.

There are growing reports that Samsung might be halting production of the unit until it can better understand what is causing the fires.

"We are temporarily adjusting the Galaxy Note7 production schedule in order to take further steps to ensure quality and safety matters," said an Irish spokesman for the company.

However, the spokesman noted that the company has set a date for the Note7 to go back on sale in Europe from October 28th.

The overheating phones have caused Samsung an estimated €1bn of damage so far. What was thought to be a problem isolated to one batch of batteries has escalated to replacement models.

Irish Independent

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