Tuesday 27 September 2016

Mark Zuckerberg wants Facebook to be able to read your thoughts

Published 15/06/2016 | 13:49

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook already knows more about you than most of your friends: now it wants access to your thoughts and feelings.

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Mark Zuckerberg believes online sharing will eventually go beyond video or virtual reality and extend into people posting their raw emotions and thoughts, Facebook's founder said on Tuesday.

Read more: Facebook could be ‘all video’ within five years

"What I think we’re going to get to... past VR, is a world where more than just being able to capture what’s going on in a scene, I think you’re going to be able to capture a thought, what you’re thinking or feeling, in its kind of ideal and perfect form in your head and be able to share that with the world" he said in a Facebook Q&A session.

"Of course it’s really important that people have the power to do this in the way that they want, to be able to share that with other people."

The technology sounds like the realms of science fiction, and Zuckerberg said it was "probably decades down the line" and that Facebook wasn’t working on it, but mentioned research in which scientists were able to ascertain what people were thinking about based on MRI scans.

It isn't the first time Zuckerberg has talked about reading thoughts. Last year, he said that telepathy would be the "ultimate communication technology".

For Facebook, it would represent the natural evolution of sharing, from text to photos, video, VR and now thought, although the idea of the internet giant having a direct line to your brain is more than a little disturbing, especially given the company's many, many privacy controversies over the past few years.

But just wait a while, and we might get used to it, Zuckerberg said. “Having the raw ability over time to be able to share a pure thought or feeling in the way that you want, and give you control over that… 50 years from now, that might not be a crazy thing to think about,” he said.

Reuters

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