Monday 25 September 2017

Google has best reputation with public for third year

Gabriel D'Arcy, managing
director, Bord na Mona; Tanaiste
and Minister for Foreign Affairs
and Trade Eamon Gilmore; Frank
Hayes, director of corporate affairs,
Kerry Group; John Herlihy, vicepresident,
international SMB sales
and head of Google in Ireland;
Niamh Boyle, managing director,
Corporate Reputations; Henrik
Stroier, managing director and
partner, Reputation Institute world
wide; and Andrew Langford, chief
executive, FBD
Gabriel D'Arcy, managing director, Bord na Mona; Tanaiste and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade Eamon Gilmore; Frank Hayes, director of corporate affairs, Kerry Group; John Herlihy, vicepresident, international SMB sales and head of Google in Ireland; Niamh Boyle, managing director, Corporate Reputations; Henrik Stroier, managing director and partner, Reputation Institute world wide; and Andrew Langford, chief executive, FBD
John Mulligan

John Mulligan

GOOGLE has been named the most reputable company in Ireland by the general public for the third year in a row.

The Ireland RepTrak study asked over 3,700 members of the public in Ireland how much they trusted, admired and respected companies operating here.

Scoring just 28 out of 100, Quinn Group got the second-lowest rating, with cigarette maker John Player & Sons having the worst reputation amongst the Irish public, with a rating of just 27.1.

Google scored 80 and was the only company to do so, compared to six who achieved this in 2011. However, its score was down from 86.3 in 2011.

A total of 101 organisations were ranked by the survey, including multinationals, indigenous firms and semi-state bodies. It found that 78pc of those companies surveyed have seen their reputation decline in the past year.

Trust

"In a declining economy, the trust in companies diminishes on average by 2pc," said Niamh Boyle, managing director of PR firm Corporate Reputations, which compiled the list for Ireland as part of a wider global survey.

"The general public are as much concerned about the companies behind the products and services they purchase as the products themselves," she added.

Food-manufacturing companies were perceived by the public as the most trusted in Ireland. Kerry Group came second on the overall list, with 79.1 points, up from 69.5 in 2011.

Apple was next on 78.8, while Cadbury, which is now owned by Kraft, scored 78.5. Kerry Group was also the top-ranked indigenous company, with Eason coming second, Dairygold third and Arnotts fourth.

Unsurprisingly, banks fared terribly. The best rated was KBC Ireland, part of the Dutch KBC group, with 55.74 points. It hadn't previously been included.

Ulster Bank was second, EBS third, Permanent TSB fourth, followed by Bank of Ireland and AIB was last, with just 37.4 points.

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