Sunday 22 October 2017

Dublin Web Summit: App developers reveal the secrets of their success

Alex Hawkins, Founder and CEO of SmartThings
Alex Hawkins, Founder and CEO of SmartThings
Paddy Cosgrave, Founder of Dublin Web Summit speaking on the main stage
Microsoft Ireland, joined by CoderDoJo co-founder James Whelton, announced its plans to host the Microsoft App Factory at this year's Dublin Web Summit which kicks off today and runs for two days in the RDS Dublin
Microsoft Ireland, joined by CoderDoJo co-founder James Whelton, announced its plans to host the Microsoft App Factory at this year's Dublin Web Summit which kicks off today and runs for two days in the RDS Dublin
Pictured at the 2012 Dublin Web Summit at the RDS this morning were Titan The Robot with Gavin O'Flaherty, Corporate Partner Mason Hayes & Curran, sponsor of this year’s Summit, the biggest technology event in Europe

Peter Flanagan New Technology Correspondent

IF you want a successful app or company, you need to be working on something your want to make for yourself, not just as a way to make money.

That was the message from three developers this afternoon at the Dublin Web Summit. Addressing attendees on how to make an app that will eventually find a major market, Steve Greenwood, who runs Brewster, an app that integrates with a person’s social networks and address book to help with a problem, said the idea for his idea came from trying to solve his own a predicament first.

“My mother was visiting me and I wanted to bring her to a comedy club but I had no idea where there were any clubs, and Brewster was a way to solve that problem,” he said.

Similarly Matt Paul of Schematic Labs explained his app SoundTracking came from his desire to share music with his friends without infringing copyright law.

“We didn’t come up with the ideas out of thin air. Nobody wakes up one day and says “this is what I’ll do”, most ideas come from what you are doing and what you care about.

“If you want to fix something, or you want to do something but nobody else is doing it, that’s what will work,” Mr Paul added.

“You have to care deeply about what you are working on.

“Start with something you know and are passionate about, and that will motivate you to persevere with it and be successful.”

The Dublin Web Summit continues until tomorrow, with some 4,000 people either attending or exhibiting at the event.

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