Business Technology

Friday 22 September 2017

Apple admits developer website hacked

The phone that changed it all. With Steve Jobs' announcement that Apple were ‘reinvent[ing] the phone’, mobiles became no longer just phones but ‘handheld computers’. And with its multi-touch screen, buttons were no longer seen as a necessary part of a phone. Photo: Reuters
The phone that changed it all. With Steve Jobs' announcement that Apple were ‘reinvent[ing] the phone’, mobiles became no longer just phones but ‘handheld computers’. And with its multi-touch screen, buttons were no longer seen as a necessary part of a phone. Photo: Reuters

Apple's Developer Centre website has been breached by a Turkish security researcher and was taken offline last Thursday.

Around 275,000 logins are believed to have been affected by the breach, the first known against Apple's web services.

Apple claims sensitive information had been encrypted and could not be accessed, but that the company "could not rule out the possibility" that developer names, mailing addresses and email addresses may have been accessed. An Apple spokesman said no apps or customer information had been compromised.

In an email to developers sent last night, Apple said it was "completely overhauling our developer systems, updating our server software, and rebuilding our entire database" to avoid further breaches.

It continued: "We apologize for the significant inconvenience that our downtime has caused you and we expect to have the developer website up again soon."

The site is not available to customers, and contains beta updates of the company's latest iOS 7 system in order for app developers to test their latest projects. The attack in the run up to the release of the new operating system comes at a crucial time for app developers.

Turkish security researcher Ibrahim Balic posted a video on YouTube claiming responsibility for the cyber attack, which he claims was not a hack but a test of Apple's security systems.

Balic states he reported the bugs he uncovered to Apple, and that he will delete all of the data he accessed.

The App Store and iTunes services are unaffected by the attack, and have continued to trade as normal.

Unknown hackers managed to bring down Sony's PlayStation Network in April 2011, which was kept offline for an entire week whilst Sony attempted to repair and enforce its security.

Telegraph.co.uk

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