Wednesday 18 October 2017

Amazon Prime Music takes on Spotify and Apple Music

Paulo Nutini
Paulo Nutini

Sophie Curtis

Amazon has launched its music streaming service, Prime Music, in the UK, offering Amazon Prime members access to over a million songs and hundreds of playlists at no additional cost to their membership.

Amazon Prime first launched in the UK eight years ago, offering unlimited one-day delivery on millions of items for £49 a year. Since then it has raised the price to £79 a year and branched out into cloud photo storage, video streaming and e-book lending. It also offers one-hour delivery in London on over 10,000 items.

Now it is adding Prime Music, which launched in the US last year and allows subscribers to stream or download music without added fees or interruptions from advertisements.

The range of music on offer is significantly smaller than that of Spotify or Apple Music, which each have some 30 million at their disposal. However, both Spotify and Apple Music cost £120 per year, whereas Prime Music is bundled with other Amazon Prime services – such as Prime Instant Video, Prime Now, Kindle Lending Library and Amazon Cloud Drive – for £79 per year.

"Choice is something we don’t see at play that much in the music streaming market, so if you are a music streaming customer you can either pay £120 a year, or you can be subject to interruptions from ads or other listening restrictions through one of the free services," said Paul Firth, head of Amazon Music UK.

"We know, through having spent 15 years selling music to people, that there are a lot of customers who really love music but for whom £120 a year is a lot of money, so to be able to offer them that music streaming service as part of a £79-a-year package, along with all those other benefits, that offers great value to our customers."

Prime Music includes tens of thousands of albums from chart artists like One Direction, Royal Blood, George Ezra, Paolo Nutini and Ella Henderson, plus classic artists like Bob Dylan, Madonna and David Bowie.

Telegraph.co.uk

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