Thursday 21 September 2017

Smartphone honeymoon period lasts only four months

A quarter of people said they become frustrated with their smartphone within just a month
A quarter of people said they become frustrated with their smartphone within just a month

Matthew Sparkes

Smartphone owners admit to getting bored with new handsets just four months after buying them, as updated models are released and bought by friends and colleagues.

A quarter of people said they become frustrated within just a month.

A third of Britons said that they always want the latest handsets, and 60 per cent admitted that they would change phones even if their current one still worked perfectly, a new survey by O2 shows.

Brits currently change phones on average every two years, meaning they hold on to handsets more than five times longer than they want to. Britons spend an average of £270 each to upgrade to the latest phone, which equates to the nation spending £17bn every two years.

The pressure to upgrade is driven by the media, according to 20pc of people, and by jealousy when friends buy new models, say 19pc.

A quarter of people (24pc) claim that early termination charges for getting out of a current contract is the biggest reason to delay an upgrade, with 45pc claiming that they would buy a new phone more frequently if they were lower.

The research revealed that men were slightly more pragmatic than women, with 44pc admitting that if their device worked perfectly well they would not switch, compared to 37pc of women.

David Johnson, general manager of devices for O2, said: “With technology advancing by the day it is perhaps little surprise that the initial euphoria of owning a new device wears off faster than ever.

“However, it is interesting to see that technology is now giving the fashion world a run for its money – with the nation waiting on the new season must-haves.”

The company offers a service called Speed to O2 Refresh, where customers can get a 25pc discount on buying-out the remainder of their contract in order to upgrade to the latest phone.

Telegraph.co.uk

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