Thursday 29 September 2016

Tipp hurling star Gleeson banned by Central Bank after probe

Published 05/05/2016 | 02:30

Tipperary hurling goalkeeper Darren Gleeson Photo: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE
Tipperary hurling goalkeeper Darren Gleeson Photo: Stephen McCarthy / SPORTSFILE

An All-Ireland medal-winning Tipperary hurler has been banned from acting as a financial adviser by the Central Bank.

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Darren Gleeson, of Nenagh, had worked in a brokerage firm in the town.

He was awarded an All-Ireland medal in 2010 as a non-playing substitute in the Tipperary team. He also won the National League and five Munster titles.

The Central Bank said that following a fitness and probity investigation conducted in accordance with the Central Bank Reform Act 2010, a prohibition notice has issued against Mr Gleeson, of Portroe, Nenagh, Co Tipperary.

Regulators said he was formerly a director of a retail intermediary firm, but did not name the brokerage.

It has now emerged that Mr Gleeson had worked in Quinlan Financial Services in Nenagh.

The move by the regulators prohibits him from carrying out any controlled functions, including pre-approval controlled functions, in any regulated financial service provider for an indefinite period.

It is not clear why the Central Bank has moved against him.

Hugh Maloney of Quinlan Financial Services, a company that sells pensions and life insurance products, said Mr Gleeson left that firm in October.

"Darren has moved on, and I have no further comment. We run a regulated firm here," Mr Maloney, a former Tipperary hurler, said.

Mr Gleeson (35) has been a regular member of the Tipperary hurling starting 15 and has won five Munster medals, and won the National Hurling League.

The 6ft3in net-minder collected an All-Ireland medal in 2010 as a non-playing substitute following Tipperary's 4-17 to 1-18 defeat of Kilkenny. Known for his pinpoint puckouts, he was an All Star in 2014.

Under the Central Bank Reform Act 2010, regulators have powers to approve senior appointments to regulated firms and powers to investigate, suspend, or prohibit persons from the financial services industry where concerns arise about their fitness and/or probity.

The fitness and probity standards provide that a person performing a controlled function is required to be competent and capable, honest, ethical and to act with integrity be and financially sound, regulators said.

Irish Independent

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