Monday 26 September 2016

'I'm annoyed because I think it could have been handled better'

Published 19/03/2016 | 02:30

Jabor Ringhoffer and his son Alex (12) pictured moving out of their apartment in Residents of Eden, Blackrock, Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney
Jabor Ringhoffer and his son Alex (12) pictured moving out of their apartment in Residents of Eden, Blackrock, Cork. Photo: Daragh Mc Sweeney

Computer specialist Jabor Ringhoffer warned that Ireland is fast becoming a country where skilled overseas professionals can no longer afford to live and work.

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Jabor, his partner, and his son, Alex (12), yesterday moved out of the Eden complex in Blackrock, Cork that they have called home for over two years.

Like 35 other Eden residents, they received a notice to quit from the complex receivers last January - just six months after seeing their rent increase by 25pc from €1,000 to €1,250.

Jabor had been told to quit his flat by March 18.

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"I am annoyed because I think it could have been handled better," he said.

"It has been very difficult to find another place to rent here in Cork.

"We were told in January to leave the complex but it took us a long, long time to get a letter of reference so we could rent somewhere else."

"The delay in getting that letter meant that we lost out on two other nice places," he said.

Jabor and his family have now found a lovely new home in Passage West - ideally located for when Alex starts secondary school next September.

"We had planned to move anyway but we ended up having to move about six months earlier than we planned."

The increasing expense of renting a family home in Ireland came as a major shock to the family.

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Jabor, who worked previously in his native Hungary and then in France, warned that Ireland is now sowing the seeds for potential future economic problems with its latest housing crisis.

"I love working and living in Ireland," he said. "I know people who would love to come here to work but cannot afford to do so because of the house prices."

"These are not people who are coming here to take Irish jobs. They are people who are doing skilled work that Irish people aren't available to do. How many Irish people speak Hungarian, for instance?

"There are skilled people who would like to come to work and live in Ireland from overseas but they just cannot afford it.

"I think the shortage of housing and rising rent costs are a big problem."

Irish Independent

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